August 2000 Questions

Digger Odell Publications © 2000

Hello, I have a quick question that I hope you can answer- I can't decide if the lip on this old pontiled bottle is broken or if it has always been this way from when it was made. This bottle is about 6 inches tall, is 12-sided and irregular shaped. The base has an open pontil with about a 1/2 inch kick-up, and has a faint line (seam?) right across the middle of the base. The lip is sharp/rough all the way around and has one higher pointed area- it appears broken, but the neck looks the right length to me. The very top of the lip is bulged out or a little thicker. I'd appreciate your opinion as to the age of this bottle and whether it is damaged or not. I've attached a couple of scans that I hope are helpful. Thanks! Also, thanks for your informative website- it's great! Jay

Jay, In my opinion, the bottle is broken off but this is how a bottle might have looked when broken off the blow pipe.  So I can see your dilemma.  Typically sided pontils, such as yours, have either a flared or a rolled lip.  The bulge might be marking where the mold ended and glass.  I am having a hard time imagining what the lip would have looked like. I suppose it is possible that a bottle was packed without it having had its lip finished.  Your bottle was made between  1840-1855. Digger

DEAR SIR : WE HAVE FOUND THREE BOTTLE BASES AROUND OUR FARM WE LIVE IN SOUTH AMERICA LIMA PERU. THOSE BASES HAVE THESE CONDITIONS : DARK GREEN GLASS WITH THE WORDS C W & Co WE DO NOT KNOW IF THEY ARE FROM BEER OR WINE OR OTHER. WAITING FOR YOUR HELP ALVARO MILON E.

Sounds like ale or wine bottles as the color was typical of such products.  They probably were made after 1860 since earlier bottles probably would not have the bases embossed.  I couldn't find any reference to the letters on the base, but they likely  refer to the glass company that made the bottles.  Digger

Hi, I found your e-mail address while searching the web and hope that you can offer some advice. While cleaning out some "stuff" in the garage, I came across a set of Log Cabin syrup bottles that were manufactured in commemoration of the bicentennial. They each depict (in the glass itself) a historic event related to the United states. They were never used. They are clear in color and were produced at Metro Glass in Jersey City. My wife used to work there and they gave out sets of these to some of their employees at the time. Quite honestly, we had forgotten about them until the other day. Do you know if these have any value? Or, do you know of someone who might be able to tell us? Whatever information you can provide is helpful. If you need more information, please let me know and I will be happy to provide it. Thanks, Dennis

Dennis, this question have come up every month for the last few months.  I gave more information in earlier months answers.  The bottles are very common and have little value.  Most sell for $2-3.  Digger

Hi I have a Mennen baby oil antiseptic bottle with the lid and the stuff inside its a screw on black lid the label is almost perfect its 3 inched high and1 1/2 inches wide can you tell me any thing about this bottle please thank you.

The Gerard Mennen Chemical Company of Newark, NJ first gained prominence with its Borated Talcum Toilet Powder.  They were in business at least as early as the 1890s and are still in business today.   They found their niche in child care and baby products and expanded into other toiletries.  There does not appear to be much interest in collectibles  from the company outside of their advertising which seems to sell well.  Collectors like the magazine ads, trade cards and tin signs. Check out these Modern tin signs  copies of advertising by the Mennen Company.  Your bottle may be from the 1950-60 period.  Digger

WHY AREN'T YOU 
OUT DIGGING? 

 

YOU COULD BE! 

 

pix

Digger, I was referred to your great site when I was researching a Marchand Glycozone bottle. I will include a pic of it in case it doesn't fit the other info I posted. The bottle is full and has a slight melt spot on the base with raised lettering on the back side. This bottle (flask) is about 5 3/4 inches tall. Has a twist in it. The base has a broken circle about the size of a quarter. The top is irregular and there are no seams in it. I took it away from my wife for about 10 minutes. The Pic says more than words. Wes Swisher

Wes, Glycozone was introduced about 1885 by Charles Marchand of New York City.  He established the Marchand Institute and later the Drevet Manufacturing Co.  Marchand remain president of the company until 1908 when his partners Joseph and George Rose eventually gained full control and regorganized under the name The Charles Marchand Co. about 1918.  The Drevet Manufacturing Company in addition to producing the Glycozone made several other products including Hydrogen Peroxide (comes in a cobalt bottle with Marchand's name embossed), an Eye Balsam, Hydrozone and other products.  A photo of a labeled specimen, similar to yours, appears in Richard Fike's The Bottle Book.  His bottle is earlier than yours at the top of his label it says, "An absolute cure of dyspepsia, catarrh of the stomach, cancer of the stomach, heart, blood, etc."  Most of the rest of the label is like yours except at the bottom yours says, " Reg. U.S. Pat. Off."  The wording on your label indicates to me that the bottle was produced after the Food and Drug Act of 1906.

Your second bottle appears to me to be a modern reproduction.  The poor quality of the picture makes this just a guess.  The bottle looks a bit like what has been described as a poison flask but the mouth is too wide. It is probably a Clevenger reproduction called the "Diamond Flask."  The bottle might have been blown in the 1960s. A catalog from that era gives the heights of the flask at 5 1/2 inches.  You'll find more information about the Clevengers on my article about them.  Digger

 

Hello I recently came into owning a wood crate with the words"Parke Davis" on it, on the outside - and inside is a large light greenish bottle [ crate says 5 gal. - so I guess a 5 gal bottle ] with only a small amount of a paper label showing on the neck of the bottle.. Alcohol being the first ingredient, chloroform {?}, then also horehound, and some-other herbs and spices... Can not get a good look at the bottle - it was not intended to be taken out of the crate - as I can tell via how the crate is made... BUT I can tell that the top of the neck and the lip is hand blown [ no seam there, plus the shape shows it was hand blown [ i.e.: imperfect/a bit crude shaped].... Wondering if you have any idea when pharmacist stopped bottling their items to sell, via transferring the liquids from the crated bottles into their own smaller bottles???? Is there a date when this practice was stopped? Have already e-mailed Parke Davis to try to get more info - but as of yet- no response!! And yes, the bottle has a cork [ a very desecrated one ] and still has most of the "medicine" in it! Though I would dare to call it medicine [ more like strong twice fermented booze!] Also how common is these crates and bottles? This is the first I have seen of this intact still, but would guess that it is not too uncommon since dealing with pharmacy "medicines" as such, was common years ago. Any info that you might be able to give me, would greatly be appreciated! THANKS!

The practice of building crates around demijohns or carboys was common and lasted well into the 20th century.  Sometimes the crate was constructed in such a  way as to make the pouring out of the contents easier by mounting the crate on a swivel of some sort.  I have also seen machine made bottles with packing crates built around them, acid was commonly sold this way for industrial use. These large bottles in their crates are not commonly found today but may not be easily saleable either.  The size of these items limits the number collectors willing or able to find space for them in their collections. Although Parke Davis Co. has been in business since 1866, I would suggest your bottle was made between 1890 and 1915. 

  From descriptions in the drug catalogs of the times most items were sold in smaller quantities than 5 gallons.  I found very few items sold in such large quantity.  Syrups for making root beer and other soft drinks sometimes were but quart and gallon sizes were much more common. My guess is rather than the druggist simply refilling smaller bottles, it makes more sense that they would use the ingredients in compounding their own. It would be helpful if  you were able to make out the name of the product. Digger

I am not into collecting soda bottles but have a question I bought a soda bottle from ebay because on it is my surname Loy any ideas on where to look for info on this bottle clear embossed J.H. LOY bottle. It's a large straight sided 12 oz. size. On the front and back shoulder is embossed LOY in block letters. On the heel is embossed PROP. OF J.H. LOY. On the bottom is embossed GRAHAM N.C. 12 OZ LGW. Thanks Angela Loy

The LGW on the base probably refers to the Laurens Glass Works Laurens SC. The company used LGW since 1913. I would not think you bottle was that early.  I would suggest that you contact the reference librarian at the Graham, North Carolina library.  They might have City Directories.  I'd ask if they could check the 1930, 1940, and 1950 directories for mention of the name and or company.  Depending upon their available time they might also check any other files (research, obituary, phone books) which may contain information about Mr. Loy or his bottling concern.  You might have them check the current phone book to see if any living relatives are in the area.  Often they can provide information.  If you live near there a trip there might prove fruitful.  Information such as you seek takes lots of time and patience to uncover.  Digger

Hi Digger, While we were out in Frederick Md. We were walking in the woods and came across a old coke bottle the top looks like a regular coke bottle but the bottom is square. I t has the words soda water contents 6 fluid oz around the middle of the bottle and at the bottom it reads property of coca cola bottling co Pat. DES. no.70281 and on the very bottom of the bottle reads Frederick MD.with a 3 and a 5 on it if there is anything you could tell me about this bottle thank you Lynn

Technically, your bottle  is not a Coca-Cola bottle, that is it ,never held the product Coca-Cola. It actually was used for various flavors bottled by local Coca-Cola bottlers. These so-called "flavor bottles" were produced in various designs and with a number of different names including Buck Brand Soda Water, Big Chief, Fanta and others.  One of the more common ones is sometimes called the "star' flavor bottle named for the embossed stars on the bottle.  These bottles are not much sought after by Coca Cola collectors. The Coca-Cola embossing  is usually in-block letters instead of the traditional Coca-Cola script lettering. Your bottle with a Design Patent Number of 70281 would have been made after 1927. These bottles often sell in the $3-8 range.  Digger

Update from a reader: Thanks for participating. Digger

On page 193 of BJ Summers price guide (the 1999 version) this "star" bottle is listed for $65. It is also shown on the back cover of his later book (2001) altho I didn't take the time to look it up in it. I am fortunate enough to have three of these bottles, and my friends who are collectors have for years tried to get one of them from me, even at the point to trying to steal one, so it surprised me to see that you said the bottles are "not desirable" among Coke collectors. I have not seen but two or three of these bottles on the shelves of any antique shop over a period of many years, and when I did see one, the least I ever saw one for was $55. So again, your value of $3-8 surprised me. I would buy them all day long for that price range. All the "flavor" bottles in my collection are priced pieces, because they have history, plus there would not be so many of them in circulation. It has been my experience that collectors do want the flavor bottles, if nothing more than a 'go-with" their branded ones. Just like in James Ayers price guide, it lists one of the flavor bottles used by Pepsi as rare, and gives a value of $85. So if these flavor bottles were not "desirable" among collectors, then why do they value higher than many of the branded bottles? Just a thought,
A. Sathe

I recently found this bottle @ a work site that was a dump site for Freeport, Texas. It is a: Scott's Emulsion Cod Liver Oil with Lime & Soda ; it has a raised/embossed Trade Mark with a fisherman carrying a cod over his shoulder. Do you have any idea how old this bottle might be? It is in perfect condition but does not have a lid. I also have a Vaseline jar from Chesebrough, New York. Do you know what "Marinello" is? I'm assuming it is a crème perfume or face cream due to the jar resembling a cold cream jar. Thanks for your time and knowledge!!! Sincerely, Beverly Brock

Blue Seal Vaseline was the product sold in the Chesebrough Vaseline bottles which are common in turn of the century dumps and privies.  The product was invented in 1888.

You'll find the Scott's Emulsion question in a number of different earlier months of "Ask Digger." Yours sounds like it might be machine and from the 1920-30 period.  I am pretty sure I have covered the Chesebrough Vaseline question before as well.  Robert A. Chesebrough, a New York chemist learned how to convert a by-product of oil drilling operations into a wound treatment.    The product was widely distributed under the name "Blue Seal Vaseline Petroleum Jelly."  In 1908, the cork top was replaced by a screw cap.  Chesebrough died in 1933. The product is still available.  I couldn't find a listing for "Marinello." Digger

Dear Digger, I found this bottle while digging at work. I don't know too much about old bottles other than what I read briefly on your web site. I am just curious to see some kind of background or history, and possibly monetary value. Here are some approximate dimensions that may help- height- 6 1/4" bottom sphere- 1 5/8" top sphere- 1 5/16" square tube center- 1" Also, I can see seams on either side so I'm assuming that it has been molded, and the only writing I see on it is the number 3 embossed on the bottom. I sent this picture in hopes that it might help. Any information you can send me will be greatly appreciated. Curious.

I am guessing that the bottle is food related, possibly a sauce of some kind.  I doubt that it has much monetary value.  Most collectors are looking for earlier bottles.  yours appears to be from the 1930-40 period.  Maybe a reader will know.  Digger.

 

Dear Digger, Recently I have been finding beautiful bottles only to have them crack I guess to temperature changes. Have you had this problem and do you have any solutions. Thanks ,Steve

Steve,  I have a sad and similar story to relate.  We dug an emerald green, iron pontil, 12 sided "Jones Empire Ink," a really valuable bottle worth in the multiple thousands of dollars.  I took it home and washed it and set it on the shelf.  A week or so later, when a friend was visiting, I took it out and handed to him to show it off and he said, " Did you know the bottle was cracked?"  I didn't - and upon examining it I found not a small crack but a large unmistakable crack running down one side and around the base.  Such was this crack that I could not have missed it while washing the bottle.  I have over the years heard of such things as bottles spontaneously going "pop" in collector's cases without any apparent cause.  I have also heard that if a bottle when it is made is not annealed properly, there will be much tension in the glass and any small change in temperature or surrounding might cause damage as mentioned above.  Diggers who dig in cold winter weather are careful to immediately wrap their finds (which underground have been a steady 50 degree or so) to protect them from extreme temperature changes.  I can imagine the same thing happening in very warm weather.  If you are concerned, wrap your finds in the hole or keep them in the shade to let them warm up or cool off gradually. Leaving them in the car in hot weather may also be dangerous. Likewise displaying bottles in windows may expose them to dangerous temperature variation.  This is especially true for dark colored bottles which will heat up quickly. On the other hand, it might be in our excitement, we just missed the damage which was there along.  Digger

I found a small clear bottle (glass) with wonder bubbles embossed on it. I know the wonder bubbles product is still being made however I never remembered it coming in glass bottles I was wondering if you knew when they quit using glass and went to plastic. Also is there a category for children's bottles. And last is this bottle rare or quite common. Thanks deb

Deb, I do not know the date but I'd guess your bottle dates to the 1950s or earlier. The only categories for children's bottles would be nursing bottles. Most machine made bottles of the sort you found would not be rare, especially in light of the fact the company is still in business.  They must have been successful. I'd guess a value of $2-3.  Digger  

 

I found a bottle and I wanted to find out what I could. can you help? it's amberish in color, stands up about 5 inches, is square, with rounded edges. and has "Wyeth 205" on the bottom.  It does have a short round neck, about a inch long.  Any help I would appreciate thank you Brian Morse

John and Frank Wyeth started their chemical company in Philadelphia about 1860.  They produced products such as Wyeth's Coca Leaves Aromatic Essence, Wyeth's Pepsin, Wyeth's Pancreatin, Wyeth's Linseed Oil and Heroin, Wyeth's Cod Liver Oil and Hypophosphites, Wyeth's Catnip and Fennel, Wyeth's Quino-Ferrum and hundreds and hundreds of others than would have been bottled.  The amber color would have protected the contents from light.  Digger

I have an old Stroh beer bottle that I got at a store for 5 bucks...it is clear with a seam on both sides with the words "STROH"..."DETROIT"..."and "REGISTERED" at the top of the wide part of the bottle . no label and the words contents 12 1/2 fluid ounces on the bottom. Any idea how old it could be? thanks

The best cue to the age is the type of lip.  A blob top would date roughly around 1900.  The bottles produced from about 1900-prohibition would have a crown top but might have hand tooled lips.  Post prohibition bottles would have crown tops and be machine made. The company has been in business from 1882 until the present.  Your bottle is very likely to date after prohibition and possibly is from the 1840-60 period.  Digger

Good day, I am trying to date a pocket knife through an embossed Whiskey bottle on the case. The bottle has the inscription Monopole Rye Whiskey on it. Any information on the age of the brand would be helpful, Thank you. Dave.

Dave, sorry but I was not able to locate any information.  Hopefully a reader will help out.  Digger

Can you tell me where to find antique pickle jars (preferably blue)? 

If by blue you mean cobalt blue, then I think you are out of luck.  I have never seen one.  Typically they come in clear, amber and aqua.  The best place to get high quality collectible pickles would be at GlassWork Auctions.  The above photo shows some 1870-1890 pickles.  Bottles such as those with original labels are rare.  Digger

 

Dear Digger, As I was fishing in a local stream in Pennsylvania I looked down and saw a corner of a bottle. So I bent down and dug it up. I pulled out a Mishler's Herb Bitters Bottle. I know all about Bitters Bottles from your web sight. Here are the specifications of this bottle. The writing on two sides reads Mishler's Herb Bitters. The third side reads Tablespoon Graduation With measurements reading up to 15oz. The 4th side is flat and has no writing I'm guessing this was where the label went (there is none it is worn off.) This is a rectangular bottle with a square bottom. The bottom of this bottle reads Pat Feb 6 66, Stoerkel's Crnd (this last part was hard to make out but the Patent date was very clear.) In the center of the bottom is a horseshoe type figure with an oval inside it. The height of this bottle (including the neck) is 9" in. The bottom of this bottle is a 21/2"in by a 21/2"in square. The sides with the writing on them are indented about an 1/8 of an inch, with a ridge separating them from the next side. This is a rectangular bottle with a square base. This is an amber colored bottle. The bottle itself is in good condition no stains or damage. I don't know the terms for the mouth of the bottle so I will describe it best I can. From the base of the neck of the bottle to the mouth of the bottle is 17/8"in long. When I wrap the tape measure around the neck of the bottle at the base the measurement is 37/8"in around . The same process at the mouth of the bottle is 33/8. I can't find any information on the internet about my bottle. I'm hoping that you can tell me the history and most important of all the value of the bottle. I think you have a really great web site and THANKS for reading about my bottle.

Your bottle is common but still a great find.  The difficult to read embossing says "Stoeckels Grad Pat." This refers to the graduations marked on the side of the bottle.  The apparent inventor of this bitters was one B. Mishler of Pittsburgh, PA. who began putting it about 1869.  A short time later, the product was purchased by Dr. S. B. Hartman (of Peruna fame...see other months for more details) together with a couple of partners.  They turned it into a gigantic seller.  In fact, one variant of the Herb Bitters has a panel marked Dr. S. B. Hartman & Co. Your bottle is known in amber and shades of yellow. These days, amber examples bring $40-50.  Digger

Dear Digger, I am a bottle collector and I am stumped!! I found a bottle in a bottle dump in upstate NY (Albany area). The bottle is a little cobalt blue, no taller than 1 Inch and has a screw neck. On one side it is embossed with the name "Vicks" and on the other side "drops". I think it was perhaps a sample given by a doctor in the 1930's. Have you ever seen such a bottle and do you have any information about it? Many thanks, Joyce

Other readers in previous months have asked about this bottle.  They are quite common, but collectible. Check earlier months for more information.  Digger

Hi Digger, I found a old Purex bottle, about a quart in size, and it has a cork that say's Purex in the top. It is amber or brown in color. I would like to know it's value. Thank You. Gene

Gene, you win the Purex prize for this month.* Purex was a brand of bleach.  Your bottle is very very common.  The bottles have very little value.  I gave a bit more information in earlier months.  Digger. 

(*No actual cash value )

I have found a bottle about 8oz blue/aqua color with a metal locking cap. on the outside it says M.B. & company Co. 145 west 35th street N.Y.1861. could you tell me what this is worth thanks. Ron Arkay

Ron, your bottle is a soda bottle.  The style is known as a squat soda.  Several other bottles from this same company are known.  One aqua example similar to yours is embossed "M. B. & Co. (in block lettering) - 145 West 35th St. N. Y. - 1862."  A second bottle in light green is embossed M. B. & Co. - 97 West 35th St. N.Y.  I'd estimate, in mint condition (no stain, scratches, dings, nicks or chips etc..) for the bottle to be worth $35-45.  The presence of a date is one of the nice features of your bottle.  Digger.

can you supply me with any info. on a torpedo bottle? light green in color, embossed with "Ross's" on one side, and "Belfast" on the other side. rounded bottom with a blob top. any history or value info??? thanks!!!!

Your bottle is a round bottom soda.  The above registered trademark gives some background about these very common but appealing bottles.  You'll find a fair number of questions about the Ross's and similar bottles in past months.  Value is $10-15.  One with a label like the label shown above would bring four to five times that amount.  Digger

 

Digger, I have found conflicting information on a recent acquisition. I have a medium amber bitters bottle. Markings include embossed apples on 3 sides and Berring's Apple Bitters with PHIL (A). The bottle is roughly 9 3/4" tall. It also has Wheaton NJ on bottom with possibly a reproduced pontil. I'm pretty sure it's a repro, but found some conflicting info. Can you help? Is it worth anything at all? Thanks, Deb

Deb, your bottle is a fantasy bottle.  No such antique bottle with that embossing exists. Wheaton Glass of Millville New Jersey produced your bottle in the 1970s.  The bottle was inspired by the old bottle shown at the left.  The embossing reads: " Perrrin's - Apple - Ginger - Phila - Perrines (motif of an apple).  An original would sell for $250-300.  Digger

I'm not a collector, but this one may get me started if I can find anyone who can tell me something about it. Found this bottle under about six inches of dirt and duff on the edge of the woods behind our house in Tulsa when we moved in 15 years ago. The house was built in 1937, so I suspect the bottle dates from that approximate period. Condition is generally good with only a few pinhead-sized bruises, no chips or cracks. It has light scale on the inside and needs cleaning. It is an aqua-green, crown-top (ABM) soda (I guess) bottle (7-5/8" tall). Here's the good part: it is embossed on the side with "HOME BOTTLING CO. TULSA, OKLA." and has a swastika (yes, a swastika) both on the side and embossed in the bottom. There are some machine numbers: "3197D" on the side at the bottom edge of the bottle and some undecipherable markings that look like three faint zeros just above the machine (mold?) numbers. Perhaps you could refer me to a local collector who might be able to shed some light on what this bottle is about. Would someone at the local museums be able to help? Please advise. Kenneth L. Frakes

Kenneth, believe it or not the swastika was a popular symbol, often associated with good luck prior to its adoption by the Germans around WWII.  The symbol has its roots in antiquity.  I have seen a number of bottles and trademarks incorporating it in the design.  One example is shown below.  One thing is very likely and that is that the Home Bottling Co. stopped using that symbol by the time the Second World War started.  Going with your theory it might be very close in age to 1937.  The Tulsa Library reference desk might be able to help.  Digger

 

Do you have a pic of the 5 Gal. Ka:Ton:Ka jug in your Indian bottle book? Have you seen one & do you know where I can buy one? Any help would be great. I live in Corry, Pa. where they came from but the only one I've seen was in the last Bottle & Glass magazine. I want one desperately for my Corry collection. Don from Corry...

Don, I apologize for the poor picture.   I have seen only two for sale in 30 years.  I expect you'd have to pay a great deal for one if you could find one.  My guess would $3000+. Digger  

I am looking to find the price for an Avon auburn boatail speedster I am really having a hard time finding the price for it . whatever help or advice you give would be greatly appreciated .

I checked Ebay today and found 3 for sale.  Two had bids one at $7.50 and the other at $9.99.  Digger.

Digger; Bookmarked your site a while back. Found it very informative and well-organized. I am a metal detectorist, but last year I ran into an unusually nice bottle situation and fortunately capitalized on it, so have been more interested in bottles recently. Ever hear of a Brandimist? About 1926 or so. or "Sellers Since 1919" ACL bottle? These were a couple of my finds there. Anyway why I am writing is this. I've started doing the Ebay thing, buying mostly small glass items for resale on Ebay. I bought this one thing that I thought was a piece of Japanese crockery, only to get it home and read "James B. Beam Imp(???) J New York" on the bottom of a tall cyclindrical stoneware bottle, about 13" high and about 4 " in diameter. I think this is an old-as-dirt James Beam stoneware bottle from about 1900. The bottom is unglazed, which from what I've been able to find normally means pre-1900, while the top is more indicative of post-1900, so I figure it is a transitional of right about 1900. It has a light green glaze. It was maybe bottled locally from barrels in New York? Any idea where I could go for info on this? I also found a pristine "citrate magnesia" from around 1880-1890 based on the mold lines, only to discover that apparently there was a whole set of products calling themselves "citrate magnesia." Have you ever heard of a club or book specializing in these? Have a picture of these if this is confusing. Thanks Kevin Mulrooney

 I want to correct an error on the Beam bottle.  I only know for sure that it says IM   J on the middle line. I think I picked up thinking it also said P from some post a guy made to a Jim Beam collectibles forum to ID the apparent exact same bottle.  As far as I could tell, nobody answered him.  The impression appears to have been punched in by perhaps a wood punch.  The "James B. Beam" that curls across the top is very clear, but about half of "New York" is either smoothed over or not depressed deep enough.  Almost all of the center line is either obliterated or poorly impressed, but IM can be clearly read on the left and J on the far right.  At the bottom of the Beam bottle in the pic is the stamp.  It appears to say 0.7 which is followed by a fancy mark that looks a bit like a script L but I'm sure doesn't stand for liters but perhaps some arcane 19th century volume symbol.  I'll try to draw a bitmap showing what it looks like.  The bottom is unglazed but has a few splatters of the light green glaze on it. A series of fine cracks run around the side of the bottom, attesting to the age. Thanks Kevin Mulrooney

Kevin,  I have not heard of your ACL sodas.  The citrate of magnesia is a common bottle.  They were made from the pontil age well into the 20th century. I have seen them in a wide range of colors as well.  To my knowledge, there is no book on such bottles.  With respect to the Beam, (and I am no expert in this area), my opinion is the item is much newer than the turn of the century.  I would guess it to be modern in spite of the age cracks. The form is wrong for the age you are suggesting.  I found a reference to what appears to be your bottle in and old copy of Hugh Cleveland's Bottle Price Guide.  He lists it under imported Beams.  Your bottle contained Beameister Wine and was imported from Germany  They are listed in five colors, brown, white, light green, dark green.  the come in two sizes 10 !/2" and 8 1/2".  Without the label, it probably has little value. I'd estimate under $10.  Digger.

Dear Digger, We have a Dodge and Olcott cobalt blue glass bottle, 2/3 full of "OIL ANISE, STAR...U.S.P.XI". It is about 10"high and holds one pound net. The lower label reads "Put up expressly for Brunswig Drug Company, Los Angeles, California." The cork top says D & O was established in 1798. Any idea of the value? Many thanks!

The Brunswig Drug Company was in business around the turn of the century.  I found it listed in 1913.  They were proprietors of probably a number of products among which was Sharp's Cod Liver Oil.  I found no mention of Dodge and Olcott.  With a good label a non-machine bottle such as yours should be worth in the range of $40-$80.  I am basing this on its size, color and age.  Digger.

Dear MR. Digger, I have an old amber colored gallon jug, with the word bleach outlined, wrote on the top just below the neck on both sides, It is a screw top bottle and has a two fingered handle, It is from around 1955 to 1959 I think. It is 12 inches high, It also has a grained texture, On the bottom it has the markings 7 <O> 60 ((in the O it has the letter I in it)). Under the markings their is also the number 2. IF you could let me know how much this bottle might be worth and any other history on it, I would really appreciate it. Thank you Conni,

Connie, if you check previous months you'll find some mention of various bleach bottles.  There just aren't any collectors in this category and there is a huge over supply of the bottles so the value isn't there.  You'll find these items in antique malls and flea markets.  I expect few of them actually sell. Digger

Dear Sirs; I recently came across a bottle found in an excavation site in Pittsburgh, Pa. The bottle is blue in color and has the name Weiss Bottling Co. Baltimore, Md. Any information would be helpful. Thank you for your time on this matter. Mitchell A Zieglar

I found two "Weiss" companies selling beer in Baltimore The Weiss Beer Brewery around 1873 and the other Washington Bottling Company, Weiss Beer Brewery from 1911-1913.  Your bottle might well be a soda bottle, but it could be associated with one of the above concerns.  The method of manufacture and form would help date it.  Digger.

I found a Duraglas bottle at my grandfathers home site. I am interested in knowing how old the bottle is. Duraglas is written in script on the edge near the bottom. On the bottom is 15, symbol (Diamond and circle with the letter I inside) and 6 at the end. Underneath the symbol is an 8. Underneath that appears E1595. It looks like a syrup or vinegar bottle. There are 10 grooves at the top of the bottle. Thanks for your help.

hey digger, i have a duraglas mug which has a Hawaiian embossed logo on it, looks like brass rings attached to a wooden handle. the raise lettering on the bottom side says 4/5 quart and the bottom has duraglas in script, a duraglas symbol, on the left side of the symbol is a 3, on the bottom is a 12., and on the right is a 5 is it worth anything? or is it just a novelty item? Carl

The diamond and circle with the I refer to Owens-Illinois, Inc. Toledo.  They began making Duraglas in 1940.  I believe you'll find more information in one of the earlier months. Carl, Hawaiian items are very collectible.  Digger

I am a collector of George Washington items (late 18th through mid-19th century prints and some Washington bicentennial pieces) and I frequently find Wheaton Bottles in a variety of colors of Washington which I continually pass up because I don't know their origin....when they were issued and whether they are reproductions. Are they Washington bicentennial items from 1932 or were there originals prior to that and the 1932 pieces are reproductions. There also is another Washington bottle that resembles a Washington wearing a tri-corner hat that comes in various colors. Again, I pass on purchasing this item because of my ignorance on the subject. Can you help me with any information on these two pieces of glassware. Thank you.

Simon's Centennial Bitters
Drawing from Bill Ham's Bitter's Bottles.

The bottles marked Wheaton bottles are less than 30 years old.  The earliest and most sought after of the Washington figurals is the "Simon's Centennial Bitters."  The trademark was  patented December 14, 1875 be Bernard Simon of Scranton, Pennsylvania.  The original comes in amber and aqua and has a double collar mouth.  Reproductions abound.  Some quite good and others obviously poor copies.  There are pontiled specimens and some highly unusual colors.  Some of the better reproduction were made by the Clevengers.  You'll find articles on my site's home page under "reproductions" which will give you more information about Wheaton and Clevenger bottles.  Your comments about the 1932 bicentennial may be significant and the time period fits with when many early reproduction bottles (flasks and bitters) were made. Digger

 

I found a Kerr glass canning jar with the word K(in script)err (in small print, also in script)"self sealing" "wide mouth" "mason" are are upper case and raised print on the face of the jar. On the bottom are the words KERR GLASS MFG CO SAND SPRINGS OKLA around the base, and in the center, it says PAT 2 AUG 31 1915, also in raised print. Do you know anything about this jar? A search of the web leads me to no useful information. Thank You for any time that you might put into this effort. Gerry

I found listing for a number of similar jars in the Red Book of Fruit Jars #7.  All with a value of $1-2 in clear.  The jar closest to yours also has the words "Trademark Reg," embossed on the front.  The base is the same except it lacks the number "2."  Digger

I've found a small clear glass bottle-- more of a vial than a bottle -- with the legend : "Keep me cold and I'll stay hot" Any ideas what this was?? Michael Knight --

Your got me on this one Michael.  Perhaps a reader will help.  Digger

I have a Simmonds nabob whiskey I think a BIM it has a circle around Simmonds the bottle has a crack in the side bottom and in the top no chips , amber in color ,

Your email did not come through or had some rather unusual scripting so I am not sure what you are wanting if you resend it, I'll try to help.  digger

Heya are any American bourbon whiskey bottles from united distillers ltd Vancouver Canada worth much ? one I have is reddish amber with a rainbow stain inside which reads American bourbon whiskey (embossed) and has an embossing of a scroll & diamond shape on front.... a big wheat grain and a shield on back (had a label I think) also has a row of wheat or corn on each side..4 stalks each side the bottom reads united distillers. Vancouver reg #9135 a <d> symbol and a # 3 is about 7 1/4 inches looks like maybe an applied top??? and seam stops just about top is this a find or just junk for a yard sale *L thanks for your time digger.. adono

Adono,  It sounds like a collectible item to me.  It has good embossing, a picture and the word American.  It might appeal to Western collectors, Whiskey Collectors and Canadian collectors.  I feel a little uncertain about putting a value on it.  Send a picture if you can and I'll post it here.  Digger.

 

DEAR DIGGER, I HAVE AN OLD COCA COLA BOTTLE THAT I FOUND IN MY YARD. MAYBE YOU CAN IDENTIFY THE YEAR IT WAS MADE. EMBOSSING: "COCA COLA" "BOTTLING WORKS" "REGISTERED" "ROCHESTER,NY" (ON BASE) "561" SIZE: 7 OZ.

 Aqua straight sided Coke bottles like yours were used from about 1905-1922.  You do not mention if the bottle is machine made which would help narrow that range down further.  If it were not machine made one could probably place it's age prior to World War I.  If it is machine made then the age is probably between 1914-1922. Digger

 

I don't know if you can help, but I found an old bottle up in the attic of "Z-L antiseptic mouthwash & gargle" by Norwich Pharmacal Company. I was just wondering if you knew how old it might be? It still has liquid in it! The label is still on it, but is crackling up, how do you preserve it? Thank you! Amy

The Norwich Pharmacal Company is best known for some of the handsome poison bottles they produced.  They were operating prior to the turn of the century.  I was not able to find your product listed in sources prior to 1917 and suspect it may be later.  You do not describe the mouth and lip of the bottle which would allow me to help you date it.  Digger.

Just found my first bottle - out on a hike. I have some information and all I really want to know is the general age of the bottle before I donate it to a local trails club for historical purposes. I found a bottle with the following characteristics: -Smooth base with embossing with the words "Vicks" and "VA-TRO-NOL " the number "8" is small and found above the letters "RO" and there is an embossed triangle in the middle of the base -deep cobalt color -side seams run to the top of the tip (AMB?) - -it is about 2 1/2" X 1 1/4"

The Vick's Chemical Company introduced VA-TRO-NOL in 1931 for the nose and throat. It was still advertised in the 1980s.  Digger

 

Dear Digger: I recently acquired this bottle and cannot find anything that leads me in the direction of its type or use, much less its value. It is pontiled, is 6 3/4 inches tall, the base is 3 1/2 inches (but is not evenly round), there are 16 swirls to the right, the flared lip is 1 5/8 inches across (and not of uniform shape), it is heavily bubbled, and has stretch marks. There are no mold marks or embossing on the bottle. It has no scratches, chips, cracks, or fractures. I have attached a picture for you to view in hopes you can tell me something regarding its age, origin, use, and/or value. Any help you can provide will be greatly appreciated. Sincerely, Wayne Regl

Wayne,  It is clearly a hand blown bottle but I am suspicious about its age and origin. First of all the form is unlike anything found in early American glass yet the bottle has some characteristics of pieces from that period.  The presence of 16 swirls, the wide flared lip and the color and pontil are adapted from what one might find on a Mid-western (Ohio) piece.  The large number of bubbles is not characteristic of glass from that period.  That is not to say that one cannot find example with many "seed bubbles," but rather that glass blowers of the period tried to avoid that and preferred a clear glass (it was stronger) and they generally found that if they drew glass from the top of the vat they would get more bubbles than glass drawn from the middle or bottom of the vat. The bubbles being less dense would rise to the top of the molten mixture.  I was sorry I had to crop your excellent photographs.  The photo showing the base of the bottle, from what I can see, shows no wear on the base.  If the bottle were an early piece you'd expect to find wear on the base. All said, I would think this piece was made within the last 30 years as a decorative item.  It could be Mexican or European.  The type and quality of glass reminds me of Mexican glass.  I'd estimate a value of $20-25.  Digger

I found an old glass beer bottle that reads: C Conrad & Co's, Original Budweiser US Patent N9 6376. Can you tell me when it was bottled and its worth, if any. Thank you.

Prior to 1890, laws governing the production of beer prohibited brewers from bottling beer on at the same location as it was brewed.  Many brewers wanting to provide the public with bottled beer enlisted the help of bottlers.   Budweiser, which was introduced in 1876 was bottled by Carl Conrad & Co. the bottler chosen by Anheuser- Busch.  C. Conrad & Co. appears to have been in business from 1876-1883. I do not feel confident to give an estimate of value with seeing the bottle. Digger

I found a bottle with the word topaz written on it can you help me find a date for it

I need more information.  Check the "Ask Digger" link at the bottom of this page. Digger

Hello. I have a question concerning two wine bottles. These bottles sat on top of my mothers fridge for 38 years! And now they are one mine. What are they? One is a donkey sitting in a chair. The donkey has on a hat which appears to be a political hat. He has a yellow bow tie and belt with gray pants. The chair is on a base. I would suspect from the appearance of the paint they were hand painted. There are no words on the bottle other than the sticker "Vintage 1965" "Imported by Southern Liquor, Inc. Louisville, Kentucky" The other one is the same description except it is an elephant. The donkey contained a red wine and the elephant a white wine. On the bottom of the bottles there are different markings. The donkey has a mark in the bottle. It is a "U" shaped branch with a shield in the center topped by a crown. The elephant has a sticker marking which reads "C.A.S.A Cameri (Novara) Made in Italy. They had cork plugs. They are both glazed and in good to excellent condition. If you have any answers for me or can get me started on my journey I would appreciate it very much. In turn if you ever need to know anything about American Sign Language I would be happy to assist you! Thank, Cyndi

I was not able to locate any information about your bottles which were probably made for the 1968 election.  Maybe a reader can help.  Digger

Hi I have a small collection of Wheaton NJ colored glass bottles. They might be from the 60's and 70's. They are small bottles with Wheaton NJ on the bottom they are shaped like an ear of corn, ink , several faces of different American presidents, and more. Do you know how I can get more information regarding actual age and value as well as history of these bottles? Thanks again Linda B

Linda, you'll find numerous references to these through out the past months of Ask Digger Questions.  Also check the article on my site about reproductions.  The Wheaton Glass company is still in business.  The first group of Presidential Flasks were made in 1967 and production continued through 1974.  More than a half million were produced.  The Kennedy Canteen-type was among the first produced in 1967.  More than 55,000 were produced.  They originally sold for $5.  With respect to the other bottles in this series the numbers produced vary from a low of about 21,000 for the green Andrew Jackson to a high of over 90,000 for the Lincoln made in topaz with a satin finish.  In any case none could be considered rare. Digger.

Five gallon water bottles in wooden cases are they worth collecting and if so how much are they worth. Lyle

Some certainly are.  It depends upon if they are embossed or the cases have identifying marks. With no markings they would have $10-20 for bottles 70-90 years old.  

Dear digger, I’m new to bottle collecting and have a few questions for you on some bottles I have acquired the first is a soda ( bludwine bottling co. Orangeburg S. C. 6.5 fluid ounces) all embossed , the spelling of bludwine is blduwine. Seam is like modern day soda, color is greenish aqua, height is 7 5/8 " . The second is a ( Wyeth's beef juice , u.s. hospital size 100 c.c. ) all embossed. color is amber, height is 4 1/2" , smooth base , seam line stop's 1/2" below lip. The third is a ( L. pierre valligny or vallicny La coutte-a-coutte New York ) all embossed on front panel color is amber with almost a yellowish and a reddish tint to it . height is 6 1/8 " smooth base , mold line stops 1/2" below the lip. Also has what looks like screw threads at base of lip, maybe for a dose cup. Any info on these bottles (Value,age, rarety,etc. ) would be greatly appreciated. I will send pictures. I have a few others I have questions about but will write later about, I like to go out and hunt for and dig for bottles and do once in a while find some really neat bottles. I at some time in the near future will purchase your secrets to privy digging, and your bottle cleaning plans . Thank you very much, Donnie Mull

Bludwine was a soft drink apparently bottled in S.C. and other parts of the country in the early part of the 20th century. One bill head dated 1916 for the Bludwine Bottling Co. of Bridgeport, CT. indicated it was a subsidiary of Coca Cola . I found another reference in the Butts Co. Georgia Progress February 19, 1909 in an article, L. Norsworthy, manager of the Empire Bottling Works, states that the works turns out an average of 550 cases (13,200 bottles) of soft drinks a month. The article further states that Empire had exclusive manufacture and sale in this territory of Bludwine and Wiseola,  two very popular soft drinks. Apparently permission to manufacture the drink was sold to a wide number of bottlers across the country.  I found at least one collector advertising that he wanted "Bludwine" bottles.  I'd estimate the value around $8-10.
Your Wyeth bottle is another turn of the century piece.  An earlier question this month has some information about the company. The value is probably $4-8.  I wasn't able to locate anything about your third bottle.  Digger

 

I recently purchased a clear glass bottle with the following characteristics: The 5/16" raised letters on the front are ARMOUR AND COMPANY CHICAGO. Above the letters is a monogram surrounded by a double circle with what appears to be the company's initials. A smaller monogram appears on both sides and on the copper screw top. The height of the bottle is 7 1/4" to the top of the screw top. The bottle is BIM and the width below the neck is 3 3/4" tapering to 3 1/2" at the bottom. The bottom of the glass has a number 2 in the center. This glass is in perfect condition. I am curious as to what it contained and its approximate value. Thank you very much for your time. Gayle Blunier

Gayle, Phillip Danforth Armour, founder of the firm, made his residence in Chicago in 1875.  A decade earlier he had partnered with John Plankinton, the largest pork packer in Milwaukee and by 1867 they had moved operations to Chicago for its superior rail capabilities.  His best product "Armour Star Ham" was first put up in 1877.  They produced a great many products but there main business was meat packing.  They filed for trademarks for lard, bacon, ham and all manner of cured and pickled meats. They sold "meat juice" (see the question above), soups, chicken products, salad oil, digestine ferments.  They made canned foods as well mince meat, peanut butter, jams and jellies, grape juice.  Through research and development with the volumes of inedible materials, they eventually produced sutures, strings for instruments and tennis rackets, glue,  brushes, glycerine and pharmaceutical from animals glands. By 1898 they had over $150 million dollars in business in canned meats.  It is hard to tell what your bottle might have contained.  Most food related bottles often do not bring the glamous prices that many other categories.  Without a label or clue to the contents, I'd estimate the value under $10.  Digger.

 

Examples in color are rare

hello, I have a 10'' aqua blue, blob top, smooth base bottle in very good condition. Buffalo Lithia Water. It has a woman sitting in a chair pouring from a pitcher. To the side it says Natures Materia Medica.On the base is C 10. Any help on date and value would be appreciated. Thank You, Craig Lee.

Craig,  Your bottle is well known and was popular from the 1890s and into the twentieth century.  The bottles usually bring $35-45 these days.  A few examples are known in deep teal color like the at the left and sell for a great deal more. The Buffalo Springs and company were in Virginia.  The trademark is shown below.  In their application they indicated the company began about 1897. Digger

 

Hi. I'm hoping you night be able to offer some advice. My husband has a WWII coffee bottle that is precious to him. My son, not realizing it's worth, tore the label off. What would be the best way to try to reapply the label? It is very old and fragile. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Thank-you.

The presence of the label makes a huge difference in the value of such articles.  I'd think an adhesive like wall paper glue might work. Glues like Elmer's often will cause wrinkles.    You may be able to get the label wet without hurting it.  Rubber cement might be another option.  Digger

Hi, I recently came across a bottle that has been ID as an avian (bird) water bottle, circa 1800-1850. It has a pontil (?) mark on the bottom (where it was snapped off the rod?). It basically looks like a beaker with a tube coming out of the bottom, for small birds to drink from. Although I know about civil war related artifacts, I know little to nothing about bottles, and just happened upon this at a civil war show. I wanted to know how to find out more information on this type bottle, and also a rough value of it if you don't mind. It is in good cond (no breaks) except the top APPEARS to have a tiny piece broken off...could this have been a hook, or is that just the way these were made? (At that point it also has a small flat protrusion , like to grasp it with. I am truly fascinated with this piece and would like to know more about it. Thanks! Thank you, Butch Holcombe

Butch,  over the years I have dug a number of bird related glass objects but nothing like you are describing. A picture would be helpful to further comment.  Digger

Hello I have a small clear bottle, mid sized pop bottle shape, which has "Marsh's" embossed on the glass. Could you tell me what it is from and from where? Thank you! Sherri Gallant

Sherri, I found  6 or 7 oz. Marsh's soda bottle from Portmouth, Ohio from about 1920.  Digger.

Hi. I was wondering if you had any idea if this bottle would be worth anything. It is a whiskey bottle. It's called Myopia Club. H.W. Huguley Co. 134 Canal St. Boston. It has a certificate of analysis on the back dated Boston, Jan. 22, 1902 written by Geo. W. Miles. Please help. My husband can't find anything on it. Thank you, Monique

I expect the bottle has value.  I hesitate to give an opinion without a description or picture of the bottle.  Digger. 

Dear Mr. Odell, I recently acquired a heart shaped bottle that I cannot find any information on, and would appreciate any help you can offer. The bottle is 5" high in the shape of a heart, the width across the heart is 4" and the thickness of the bottle is 2"1/4 inches. The base is rectangular, recessed smooth with the words "inne dispensables" when I used this description on the internet a "Norman Rockwell inne dispensables" bottle appeared which was nothing like mine. It is clear glass with seams running from the base to the underside of the neck on each side. The neck has an extended ring around (which if I cut through one side would look like a "P") that measures 1" inside diameter. It also (the neck) seems to have been made in two parts but the joints do not line up with the joints on the bottle. The surface of the heart is very uneven with bumps and there are thick and thin areas, also uneven surfaces inside that can be felt with my finger. There are also several air bubbles ranging in size up to a "1/4 inch, One large bubble has a side joint running right through it. I would really appreciate any information you could give me. Regards, Michael Ingleston

From your description of the way the mouth is made it sounds much like an early machine made bottle.  Possibly dating to around 1910.  The bottle sounds like it is probably a cologne bottle.  I was not able to find anything about yours.  Digger.

I would appreciate any information on a jar I have. It's white. The shape is square. The word "MUSTARD" is on one side. Instead of raised letters, they are sunken. The mouth of the bottle is round in which a screw -on lid would fit. From the base of the jar to the top of mouth, it is approximately 3 1/8 inches tall. Thanks for your time. Andrea

I am not sure what I can tell you.  The bottle could be from the 1940-50 period.  It probably has little monetary value without the lid or label.  I am not familiar with the bottle and cannot identify the company.  Digger

I recently purchased old stock from a liquor store that went out of business approx. 15 years ago. I have many unusual unopened bottles. How can I find out how much each one is worth? One in particular is a full bottle of ARDO cherry Italian wine. It is produced and bottled in Italy by LUXARDO-PADOVA. It is a 5/8 quart bottle that has a Kaiser clock that is embedded through the middle of the bottle. The clock came with a winding key and states it was made in West Germany. It is in the original box but I can not find any date stamp on anything. Are you familiar with this bottle? If so, could you send me some information on it and if possible, how much it would be worth? Thank you, Brad Boudreau

Luxardo bottles were first imported in this country in the 1930s.  One recent price guide says "Bottles in mint condition with the original label, and with our without contents are very rare, collectible and valuable.  The range of prices in the price guide go from I did not find yours listed a  low of $15 to a high of $60.  In some older price guides I found some listing for $300-500.  I found one reference in an old guide to a Luxardo clock produced in 1960 at the time (1970s) it listed for $11.  Digger

I had found a bitters bottle a few years ago and I was wondering how much it might be worth. It is aqua in color and 6 inches high. It is round but has 12 flat sides. It states ATWOOD'S JAUNDICE BITTERS FORMERLY MADE BY MOSES ATWOOD GEORGETOWN, MASS. The bottle does not have any cracks or chips. There are bubbles in the glass. On the bottom there is the letter "P" over the number 22. Could you tell me about this bottle and possibly it worth? Thank you, Brad Boudreau

Brad, the brand goes back to the 1840s and there are many many variants most of which are fairly common.  The Manhattan Medicine Company of New York purchased the rights to manufacture it from Moses Atwood.  Later variants might have a double collar top.  The bottle can even be found in the familiar aqua 12 sided shape with a machine made lip.  I checked Ebay today and found six of them for sale, three had bids.  The highest bid was $10.  Digger

DEAR SIR. I HAVE FOUND AT A GARAGE SALE AN OLD BABY BOTTLE FROM PYREX, THE NECK IS SMALLER THAN WHAT I'VE SEEN . THE NAME PYREX IS CROSS FORM COULD YOU PLEASE TELL ME HOW OLD YOU THINK THIS BOTTLE IS . MY PARENTS HAVEN'T SEEN ONE AND THEY ARE BOTH 64 YOUR HELP WOULD BE APPRECIATED, AND HOW MUCH YOU THINK ITS WORTH.. THANKS AGAIN, PAT

The Pyrex bottle was patented in 1919.  In 1922, 4, 6 ,8 and 10 ounce sizes were made.  the 4, 6 and 10 ounce were discontinued before 1928.  The small mouth took a pull on nipple and in 1930s and 40s you could purchase a Steri-Seal glass cap.  the bottles were discontinued in 1974.  the shoulders on the older bottles are slightly concave while the shoulders on the newer variants (1930+) are slightly convex.  The oldest ones have the 1919 patent date embossed on the base. I'd estimate a value of $8-10 more with the rubber nipple and or glass cap.  Digger.

Hi, I found 2 bottles and I am trying to find out what type of bottles they are. Both bottles are about 7 inches tall. The first bottle is green and has a round seal protruding from the center which reads "j m Oliver & sons", it also has a stencil on the side that reads "this bottle registered April 12,1897 and must not be sold". The second bottle is amber and has a oval seal protruding from the center that reads "James Wagniol". These bottles were found around the University of Pa in Phila. If you could help identify what type of bottles they are, I would be grateful.

The oval seal you describe sounds like what is known as a slug plate.  This was put into the bottle mold and had the lettering engraved that produced the embossed wording.  I think you have a soda bottle and a beer bottle.  Unfortunately, without a better description of the mouth, I cannot tell you much more.  Check out the Ask Digger  link at the bottom of the page for the information about what to include.  Digger.

Hi Digger... I was wondering the price on a schnapps bottle I just acquired... It is 71/4 in. tall, dark olive green, crude with lots of whittling. It sports a bulging, crude base, but no open pontil. It is embossed J. J. Melcher's Aromatic Schnapps wz on three sides of this bevel-edged diminutive case bottle. Thanks, Ron Johnson

I have not heard of this brand of Schnapps but I'd guess a value of $40-80 depending upon rarity.  I sent a note to a Schnapp's collector, we'll see what he says.  Digger.

His reply: Hey Digger,  Well it's safe to say you were on target with your pricing. I have 2 Melchers exactly as you described. 1 smooth base & 1 pontilled. ( sand, not open ) I paid 45.00 for the smooth based example and 90.00 for the pontilled one. Generally a scarce schnapps with the pontilled ones being almost non-existant. I'm still gathering items and imformation for my schnapps book.  Keep up the great work & drop me a line anytime especially if you run across any good schnapps. Even if the item isn't for sale I would like to know about it. Thanks a bunch, Joe Preast

Hi. I have a bottle that I've been trying to research, but no luck. It is a pickle bottle - 6 sided with flat panels. It has two side seams, BIM, and appears to have a rolled lip. The base is slightly indented (round) and smooth. It is aqua green, 7 inches high. The glass is in excellent shape (no cracks, chips). The label (which is shared on two of the panels) is intact, with a small piece missing on the bottom. At the base of the neck (round) there are small raised dots. The label states: Fine Mixed Pickles prepared by (then there is a coat of arms, which is much like the one I am attaching - but there are only 9 fleurs de lys on the first and fourth quarter)  Staple & Strong Co., Staple St. Bermondsey, LONDON. The label colors are green, red, white and black. Any answers re this bottle is greatly appreciated. I have looked at previous questions and answers, but have yet to find it.

Many English food products like pickles were imported into the country during the 1800s.  Many of the bottles have registry marks on the base or bottle which can help date them.  Sometimes it might just be a letter on the base.   I suspect the American bottles below look similar to yours.  I have no references to research English bottle and could not find any information on your bottle.  with a label it should have good value I'd say $40-50 minimum.

Hexagonal pickle bottles often are found in a half gallon size. 

  Unfortunately, your drawing did not come through.  The amount of decoration on the bottle itself is a factor in value.  Note the fancy panel embossing on the example at the left.  These date from about 1860-1880.  Without the decorations it would probably be later.   Digger

Hello there! I am looking for general info on ink wells, can you help me? I am a full time calligrapher and have started a small collection of bottles from my travels. Thank You, Dwight

Inkwell collectors and ink bottle collectors are two different breeds.  I have seen a book or two over the years on ink wells. There is apparently a new book out on them:  "The Collector's World of Inkwells" Written by Jean and Frank Hunting Size: 8 1/2" x 11" Illustrations: 1017 photos Pages: 288 Hard cover  over 1,000 photographs of inkwells and inkstands, circa 1750 to 1920, by makers in the United States, Europe, and Asia, including Tiffany, Wedgwood, Quimper, Staffordshire, Sandwich and Vaseline glass, majolica, art pottery, fai**ence, milk glass, and Delft.... With detailed descriptions, a historical perspective, tables on United States patents and designs, an up-to-date price guide, and an index, this book is a necessary source of information for collectors and dealers of writing instruments." A copy is for sale on Ebay today.  If it is ink bottles you have then both of my price guides would be good references.  Digger.

ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY

We have just acquired two bottles, one very dark purple the other a deep bright red. The red has been called "pigeon blood glass". No one seems to know where these actually came from, or why this particular one is called the pigeon blood. The shape is like a decanter, rectangular, about 9 inches, with an large open top with spouts on each side of the rim. Any information would be appreciated. thank-you! Dale Butler

According to one source pigeon blood glass was produced in the late 1800s.  It  may be distinguished from other dark red glass by its distinctive orange tint.  Beyond that, I do not feel qualified to advise you.  Send a picture and I will post it.  Digger.

Hello. Would you be able to point us in the right direction for information on tumbling bottles? Maybe articles or books on the subject? We are wanting to purchase the equipment necessary, but we need to educate ourselves first. Or maybe some people to talk to? Any help would be much appreciated from an expert such as yourself. Thank you, Michelle Ellis

Michelle, methods of polishing glass have been shrouded in mystery for years.  My knowledge of the subject has come from extensive contact with other persons involved in the hobby and from personal experience in cleaning.  Many of the professionals involved are reluctant to reveal their secrets.  I am not aware of any articles or books on the subject.  I do sell a set of plans with instructions with cleaning tips and on how to do this if you wish to build you own machine.  If you are looking to buy an already assembled one I know several people who will custom build one for you.  I'd suggest you check out the information on my home page under the link for "Cleaning." From that information you can get some idea of whether or not cleaning is for you.  Many beginners think they will clean just their own collections.  For the most part, it just isn't feasible.  It is not worth cleaning a bottle worth less than $20.  You'll invest too much time and or money to make it worthwhile.   Professional cleaners charge anywhere from $12-100 to clean a bottle.  Digger

Hi I'm new to digging bottles and was wondering, how do you go about finding dig sites, and old dumps? and once you find these things how do you know where to dig? thanks rock1187

Rock, the first thing you need to do is send off a check or money to purchase my digging guide called "The Secrets of Privy Digging."  In it, you will find my tips of 20+ years of digging experience.  Without being rude, good advice is worth paying for.  Bottle dumps are getting scarce.  There was in the 1970s a huge amount of digging and much of the easy digging is gone.  One can, through research find promising places and there maybe still be dumps located on private property that can be accessed.  Attend bottle shows, read all you can.  Digger

I am in search of Cuban milk bottles.... don’t know anything about them except a friend of mine wants some............ would appreciate any help or direction you could provide! thanks... Jennifer Swanger Atlanta, GA

Jennifer, About the only place I can think of would be on Ebay or through the Internet. I did a search on one search engine under the words "Cuban Collectibles" and got 41 hits some of which looked promising.   There was an event last year called "Cuban Nostalgia" 2000 Exhibition, in Miami, Florida."  There are a number of bottle shows in Florida each year.  It is possible some would show up

Also I submitted a couple of bottle questions that never got answered. The first one was that I have (in three pieces of course) a Dr. Hooflands German Bitters, Liver Complaint, not an uncommon bottle but it was OP, I have found listed the OP Hooflands German Bitters and the non OP Liver complaint, but not the OP Liver complaint, any idea? Second one I'm stumped on, It's a hinge mold (came out of the same pit as the Hooflands OP and several other OP frags) Dr. Harter's Ague Specific. I have not been able to find it in any of my books (I really need to buy your whole set so I'll quit asking so many questions don't I?, lol) or on E-bay and there are plenty of Dr. Harter's bottles out there just not this one. A little info on the cure itself , the date and the price range would be appreciated. I've attached pictures of both. Take care and dig safely : ), Jason D. Blevins Bottledigger

Jason, it looks like you have been doing some fun digging.  The authority on Bitter's Bottles is Ham and Ring's new book.  Every variant listed (open pontil or smooth base) has the words "Liver Complaint," embossed.  I have dug a number of open pontil Hoofland's over the years and all of them have had the "Liver Complaint" embossing.  I am not sure what book you are referencing, but some books give incomplete descriptions to save room.  I suspect that is the case here.  I have a listing in my pontil medicine encyclopedia for a pontiled variant of your Dr. Harter's Ague Specific.  The bottle is a product of the same Dr. Harter as the Dr. Harter's Bitter's fame.  Dr. Milton George Harter became the Dr. Harter's Family Medicine Company:  Among his products were: Dr. Harter's Fever and Ague Specific, Dr. Harter's Fever and Ague Pills, Dr. Harter's Lung Balm (two sizes), Dr. Harter's Soothing Drops, Dr. Harter's Liniment, Nerve Pills, Female Regulating Pills and of course the famous Wild Cherry Bitters.  Dr. Harter died in 1890.  Interestingly, his daughter married Mr. Hayner of Troy, Ohio (Hayner's Whiskey was a big seller around the turn of the century).  The bitters part of the business was so large that the operation was moved to St. Louis.  The C. I. Hood Co. (Hood's Sarsaparilla fame) eventually became owners of the Wild Cherry Bitters.  The bottle you dug was probably his first product which gained any wide-area distribution in the Mid-west. I'd guess that he began making it about 1855-1860.  Digger

I would like any information on this recent find, a 1 1/2" diameter base, 5 3/4" tall with 7/8" diameter lip. the 1 1/2" dia. base tapers to a 7/8" dia. in 4 1/4" of length then has a straight 3/4" neck going up to the 7/8" dia. lip area of the top. This bottle has the name "Jennings" above an oval area, the oval area is 1" high x 1 1/2" wide, inside the oval emblem is the words "Condensed Pearl Bluing" Then inside this oval printing are the Initials "C. P. B." The Seam appears to be ABM, running the full 5 3/4" length. I would appreciate any information on history or age of bottle because "Jennings" is my Wife's maiden name. Thank You Neil

I could not find any reference to your bottle.  If the lip takes a cork versus having a screw top, then I'd say it probably dates in the 1920-30 period.  If it has a screwtop then later.  Maybe a reader will help.  Digger

Can you tell me anything about this great bottle? It has a cooling crack just on the bottom, the mold line stops at the beginning of the neck and is 11 1/2" tall, clear and I think it is Pres. Taft. Mark S. Hutchins

 

Your figural bust is of Louis Adophe Thiers, (1797-1877).  He was a statesman, historian and president of France from 1871-1873.  The bottle you have is probably European and quite scarce.  A perfect specimen (shown at left for comparison) sold in 1995 for $150.

Dear Mr. Digger, I was wondering if you could give me some info. on an 1968 liquor bottle, It is about 10 inches tall, the bottle shape is of a small stocky game bird known as a quail, It is brown, white and tan in color with raised feathers, With a cork top head, There are no seams showing on the bottle it appears to be made in one piece. The base is brown and it is about 3 1/2 inches in circumference. On the bottom of the bottle writes "O.MB=2 LIQUOR.BOTTLE 1968" Thank You conni

I found listings for several quail decanters but not yours.  Maybe a reader can help.  Digger

I would like to know if you could tell me about this bottle? it has Hamlin's wizard oil embossed on it. it has a applied blob with collar. it is rectangular, aqua, base is key mold with open pontil. I would like to know anything you can tell me: age, rarity, value

I have never seen a rectangular variant of this bottle with an open pontil.  There is an oval variant with Hamlin's Wizard Oil / Cincinnati, O. and a similar one except embossed Chicago.  Both bottles are 4" with a rolled lip.  The bottle you describe rectangular with the double collar has a hinged mold smooth base. John Austen Hamlin began as a traveling magician turned traveling singing medicine show salesman.  He tour in a medicine wagon pulled by a team of horses.  In 1860, he moved to Chicago from Cincinnati.  He was later joined by his son and the business was built to gigantic proportions.  From the profits he made, he built an opera house.  The brand was still being listed in 1905.  If your bottle is as described, it is unique and would bring $200-400+.  Without the pontil, it sells for $20-25. Digger

 

any info you may have would be welcome-- small bottle-4.5 inches tall 1.5 inches square--embossed---Prof. Callan's World Renowned Brazilian gum-- clear with green tint. thank you Ahab

The bottle is not rare.  It was glue advertised around 1891 and still for sale well after the turn of the century.  I believe it was a trying to be a competitor with Major's Cement.  The two bottles are almost identical in shape.  It is sometimes mistakenly listed with medicines, but I am fairly certain it was not a medicine. Digger

Digger, I recently found your site and am excited to find out if you can tell me anything about a soda water bottle that I have with Mickey & Minnie's faces each embossed in a circle on one side with "Mickey" and "Minnie" embossed under their faces. The other side has the same Mickey face on top with the older skinny Mickey full body and "Mickey Mouse" embossed on the sides. The bottle was manufactured by Dry Bottling Co in San Antonio, TX and is in excellent condition. Can you help. Thanks Doc

I was not able to locate anything.  It might be a rare piece and valuable.  Maybe other readers have seen the bottle.  Digger.

I found a bottle embossed with "Hinds Honey and Almond Cream A S Hinds Co Bloomfield NJ USA" on the front and "A S Hinds Co IC4-IA H 17" on the bottom. The bottle is clear and it stands 3 7/8" tall. It has a square type bottle with a screw top and a smooth base. I would appreciate any info you could give me on this type of bottle. What was the cream used for, when did they stop making it, etc. It is in good condition-just a few very small scratches on the bottom rim and it is very clean. Found it in a river. Any help you could give would be appreciated. Thank you in advance. Brenda Hart

This was a hand  or skin cream bottle.  You can find non-machine made cork top examples as well as samples of this product which was popular from the late 1890s on. the bottles are common.  Digger.

Mr. O'Dell, Back in the early 1980's while working on an addition to a Detroit school that had been originally built in the 1930's I unearthed various beer, milk, pharmacy and liquor bottles. I have had them in boxes for the last 20 years and now would like to clean them to possibly try to sell them. My question is should I attempt the cleaning process and if so can you give me some pointers on what products to use, etc. I have gone online and read Glen Poch's newsletter in regards to this but I would appreciate a second opinion. Any advice you can give me will be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Bill Fenwick

Soap and water, a plastic pan or pail, kitty litter, a good bottle bush and lots of elbow grease.  The bottles unquestionably will sell better clean.  You'll find you cannot remove some stains by hand.  Check out the bottle brushes off my home page.  Follow the link below. Digger

bottle is 7" tall, light aqua in color +has a blob top. it has a smooth bottom and the letters w k embossed in it. looking from the side one side of the bottom seems thicker then the other side. on the front is embossed willibaldkuebler in an upside down horseshoe shape, under that in a straight line the word bottler + under that the words Easton pa. glass has a few defects that look like mold marks in it. Has some chips around the top. bottom is indented. The only info i have is that it was found while skin diving off the n.fla. coast but not sure of that. also just below the neck is embossed the letter w. hope this is enough info for an i.d. thanks in advance r.c.matthews

You found a squat soda dating to the 1870s.  The bottle is listed in several soda books, so I expect it is not rare, but might be scarce. The bottle originally had a wire bail and metal cap.  One wonders how it got all the way down there.  Possibly by boat.  I'd estimate the value in mint condition (no stain etc..) around $30-40.  Digger

Recently acquired a Hayner Whiskey Distillery bottle out of Troy, OH. Bottom is marked "Design Patented Nov. 30, 1897. In center of bottom is a small diamond shape with either 203 or 208 in it. The glass has turned amethyst, so it's my understanding that it once was green. The design is very similar to the 1897 patent sketch for a bottle from Alton, IL (shown on your site). Can you tell me anything more about it? Thanks, Gail

Gail, check out my comments about the Dr. Harter's bottle above.  Your bottle is common and comes in clear and amber.  The Hayner Whiskey Company of Troy (just north of Dayton, OH) also put up a combination lock bottle.  The bottle stopper had a combination lock.  The Hayner's bottles sell around $8-10.  The combination lock ones might bring over $100.   The business was at its peak around the turn of the century. The bottle was never green.  Only clear glass can turn amethyst with exposure to the sun or ultra-violet rays. Digger

I just bought a collection of Horlick's Malted Milk glass containers. Can you suggest a source to do more research on them? thanks Bob Noble

James and William Horlick began the business in Racine, Wisconsin about 1883.  Some company advertising puts the date at 1873. Their product was highly successful because of the difficulties of transporting milk products without spoilage. They developed a milk-malt-wheat preparation which needed no refrigeration and was high in natural vitamins and minerals.  At the time consumption (TB) was ravaging the country.  Millions were dying from this "wasting disease"  Many doctors and medicine maker advertised products to help patients regain lost weight.  The early  Malted Milk advertising was directed at infants, and invalids.  The beverage was tasty and became a popular drink at soda fountains.  It also was part of foods used for troops in World War I and II.  Sometime in the late 1970s or 1980s the brand was purchased by Beecham Products, Beecham Inc., Pittsburgh.  You might see if they are still in business.  I know many people collect Horlick items.  Other collectors would be a good source of information.  I expect the Racine Public Library or local historical society has a file on the company.  Digger

I have found a brown Hilex bottle that is 1 quart, 9 1/4 inches tall has a screw on cap , side seams. I don't know anything about bottles this one was discovered when we had a heavy ran and it washed some dirt away and there it was. Thank You Lori

Hilex is or was a detergent.  I do not think the bottle is too old probably no older than the late 1950s to 1970 period.  I do not think it has much value.  Digger.

Hello! We are having some serious work completed in our back yard. We live in an old coal mining town, so much of the town is back filled. We figured during this work we would come across something and of course we did. We came across an old transparent brown bottle, with its lid.. It is a pint bottle, with grapes and grape leaves all over it, excluding where the label should be. It does have a seam going all the way to the top. On the bottom of the bottle are the words "wine oval". No chips, just a pretty corrugated lid. Also on the bottom is a #6 and either NG or MG in italic. Is it something just to put in the window and enjoy or possibly worth something? Sure is a nice bottle! Thank you for your time! Barb Leedom

If you like it and since you found it I say display it.  It is a part of the history of your property.  Monetary value is not the only important consideration.  The bottle itself probably has little value but it is a piece of history.  Digger.

I am looking for info on a jar embossed on one side with COTTAGE CHEESE WASH AND RETURN and on the other side CLOVER BLOSSOM CREAMED COTTAGE CHEESE. The jar is clear and also has a row of 6 embossed flowers around the top. The seams stop at the lip. 51/2" high, 2 1/2" at base and 2 3/4" across the lip. I believe it has a rolled lip. On the inside of lip 1/4" down is another lip. The base is smooth with a circle slightly off center. Below the circle 18 appears to the left of an oblong O with a diamond across it. To the right of this mark is a 3 and beneath it is a 5. The jar is in perfect condition. No chips, cracks. Any info you can give me would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Rita Stone

Without a town or location it will be very difficult to find where this product was from.  If you found it locally then check with older residents to see if anyone has heard of the dairy.  thousands of dairies all over the country produced such bottles.  The name may not even be unique.  Digger

Hi Digger, I have a clear glass bottle that is 9" tall shaped like a rounded older lady wearing what looks like a long coat. She has a tall hat on her head and cross handed in front, is holding an umbrella in one mitted hand and a good sized hand bag in the other. On the bottom it says patent applied for, also on the bottom there is a 7,4,0, and an oval and diamond symbol. This is seamed top to bottom. Any idea what it was or is? Thanks, Wayne

I was not able to find anything out.  A picture would help.  It sounds like it has the Owens mark on the base.  Likely it was a product bottle of some type.  Digger

Hello! What a great website you have! I discovered it as I was trying to find information on a bottle stopper I recently bought. Perhaps you could help me or direct me to another source? This stopper is made of a ceramic or dark porcelain material. It looks like it was painted silver but this has pretty much all come off. It is a devil head with much detail. The cork stopper on the bottom is attached with a screw. The bottom of the cork is worn. I will try to attach a picture. Thanks for any assistance you could give. I haven't a clue. Sincerely, Kathy Bouchard

 

Your cork reminds me of the face jugs produced in the South as shown at the right.  Perhaps it was a stopper for such a jug.  It might be a stopper from a liquor container. Another possibility is a cane top.  Many canes had figures attached.  The sharp ears would probably negate this idea.  Maybe our readers have some ideas. Digger

1. Green hand blown with visible bubbles in glass blob top with lip underneath says LA - CU - PI - A down the front in raised lettering. Bottom circular mark (pontil?) with A&DHC in raised letters inside the circle. 2. Clear Blown in mold inset sides and front. Front says (leaves) Forny's Alepnkrauler Blutbeleber (leaves) fancy raised lettering. Back side says Made by Dr. P. Fahrney Chicago, ILL. U.S.A. Bottom Pat. Applied for raised letters in a circle with a 2 in the middle. 3. Clear Machine blown flat inset side with Burnett's Standard Flavoring Extracts on the front. Bottom circular mark (pontil?) with 71 in the center.

I have known about but never seen an example of your LA-CU-PI-A Bottle.  It is a product of Samuel Hartman. (Check an earlier question this month about a Mishler's Herb Bitters.)  The bottle is not pontiled.  The product, a blood medicine,  was introduced in 1877. I'd expect the value to be $5-8.

 

 

Your second bottle a product of Dr. Fahrney (He has been covered numerous times in previous months. He applied for a design patent in 1892 for his unique bottle shown at the left.

The third bottle is a product of the Burnett Company of Boston.  They are very common.  Joseph Burnett who began the company was born in 1820 and by 1845 was in business for himself as a preparer, exporter and manufacturer of syrups and flavoring extracts, toilet articles.  He also owned a number of national best sellers such as Cocoaine (for the Hair), Kalliston, Oriental Toothwash and Whitcomb's Asthma Remedy.  Your bottle dates to a period after his death, probably about 1900-1910. Digger

Trying to find out how old beer bottle is. Amber in color , has the words E . Robinsons sons then below that brewers below that Scranton PA below that it says registered. It is about 12inches tall the seam does not run to the top. there are seeds in the glass. Bottom is smooth indented circle. It has a crown top. Any information on how old and if worth anything . Thank you very much, Joe

Joe, The firm was started by Jacob Robinson in 1862.    Elizabeth Robinson was operating the concern from 1876-1890 when the firm became E. Robinson's Sons located at 434- 455 North 7th St. in Scranton.  Your bottle possible dates between 1892-1922. If your bottle is machine made it would be the latter part of that period.  I am not sure of the rarity but typically such a bottle would see for $5-10.  Digger.

I am looking for information about a bottle dated 1621 with a Mayflower emblem etched on it. I have a bottle like that , but can not find information on it anywhere . Can you help me. It has a lid on it too. thanks I think it is a old medicine bottle, but not for sure.

Your bottle almost certainly was not made in 1621 or any time near that date.  I'd nned a better description to give you a better idea.  Check out the "Ask Digger" at the bottom of this page.

Have you ever heard of JaF & Co.? A clear bottle with cork. Thanks for any help you can offer!

No, I haven't, maybe a reader has.  Digger

I am new at the Web and I am trying to find someone (or someplace) to tell me the value of a 1960's whiskey bottle that was remade because the word God was printed on the verse of the bottle. Could you advise me? Nancy McNiece

Check on Ebay for such an items.  I'd need a better description.  Digger.

ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY

 

Dear Digger, Recently, while fishing, I found a bottle buried in a river bank in Southern Illinois. I am not a bottle collector, however, I do enjoy some antiques and especially the history. The bottle I found is light pink in color. It has a seam that runs up both sides but not into the neck and also a seam around the base of the neck. It is an old "medicine" bottle and on it is raised lettering: Front side and Back side both have the words GRATIS LINE (underlined). On one on the narrow sides it has WASSON'S 3W. KING OF PAIN. On the bottom: W.W.W. King of Pain This bottle is in great shape (or at least I think so). It does not have any chips. Can you tell me anything about this bottle? Any history? Any worth? I would love to hear an expert's opinion. Sincerely, Cindy Combs

Cindi, I am pretty sure I have something about this company in my Patent Office research, I just can't locate it. I will keep looking and post it when I find it.  I did check into all my other sources without finding reference to the product.  I'd have to say the bottle is probably scarce and dates to around the turn of the century.  It is nice to have the free trial mark on the bottle.  I'd estimate a $15-20.  Digger.

Pix

Hello, My name is Joyce and would like to know if you could give me any information on the a bottle with the inscription on the bottom of the bottle simply stated: Liquor Bottle 3/4 L T Holland On one side of the bottle is ANNO 1777 and on the other is HERMAN JANSEN SCHIEDAM HOLLAND This bottle is a small clear glass decanter style bottle with a top. It is shaped wide at the bottom and has the narrow neck. I appreciate your help... Thanks, Joyce

Joyce, the bottle is relatively, probably made within the last 20-30 years. Herman Jansen operates a distillery in Schiedam, Holland.  The 1777 date refers to the date of the founding of the company.  The plastic stopper indicates a new bottle.  Value I'd suggest around $3-5.  Digger

 

 

help I found a bottle in my back yard but can't find any information on the internet about it I believe it is a beer bottle the front of the bottle reads the following in raised letters also from what I’ve read so far I believe it to be BIM molded the seams on the sides stop just short of the top and bottom. It is almost clear but I guess it would be called aqua? the bottle reads TROMMER'S EVERGREEN BR'Y BROOKLYN N.Y. REGISTERED THIS BOTTLE NOT TO BE SOLD there is also a what looks like a wheat leaf design in the middle of the bottle with a star with the letter E in the middle any information you could give would be greatly appreciated took a picture hope it comes through thanks again roy

Roy, The John F. Trommer Evergreen Brewery operated at 1632 Bushway Ave.  and Conway St.  The firm began under another name and was known as the Evergreen Brewery from 1897-1920.  Digger

Hi! I have a Canada Dry ginger ale, 10 fl ozs green bottle with a "bird perch" inside, i.e., a glass 'bridge' that goes from one side to the other of glass. The bottle must be about 15-20 years old. It is complete with label and screw-on top, in perfect condition, except it had to be opened to empty the contents to discover this amazing contemporary rarity. I would like to sell (consign) the bottle. Any interest? All best, Paul Argentini

Try putting it on Ebay. Digger

I have an aqua green bottle with a narrow 2 1/2 inch neck and a smooth bottom. There is an inscription, "SALVATION OIL" on the side of the bottle. In smaller letters, it also says, "Trade mark A C Meyer & Co. Baltimore, MD USA" I'm not interested in selling it, just curious as to what it contained. Can you help? Joan Roberts

Adolf C. Meyer & Co. had a line of popular patent medicines.  The Salvation Oil was for pain, gout, pleurisy and many other complaints.  It was introduced in 1882 and sold well past the turn of the century.  Digger

Hi, I found a bottle Friday that is clear glass and about 8 3/4" high. The raised brand name on the bottle is "Budwine". Above this brand name is the phrase "Makes You Glad" and below the brand name "You Are Thirsty". About 1/3 of the way down from the top of the bottle is raised lettering "One Better". The lower portion of the back of the bottle says "Bottle originated 1906. Patented Sept. 17, 1918. And June 28, 1921.

This appears to be a Georgia brand.  it was probably a competitor of "Bludwine" (see one of the earlier questions this month).  I found reference to it being bottled in Athen GA in a painted label bottle produced around 1946. Your bottle would be earlier.  I'd think there would be interest in collecting your bottle.  I'd guess a value of $15-25.  Digger.

i'm trying to track down bottles of my great great grandmother's remedy. I understand it was marketed as Mrs.. Joe person's bitters and Mrs.. joe person's remedy. I understand it may be listed in Carlyn Ring's book on bitters. Any chance you'd have it, or be able to steer me toward a source? thanks. penney

There is a reference in Ham and Ring's book as being prepared by Mrs. Joe Person Remedy Co., Franklinton, North Carolina.  It was a remedy for Scrofula.  The brand was trademarked in 1878 and claimed to be in business for twenty years.  To date no bottle is known for this brand.  It was almost certainly a label only bottle. Digger

Just a quick question.. What can you tell me about a hutch with "Hanigan Bros Denver Colo" embossed on it?? Thanks

Not much, your bottle is listed in one of the soda books.  The embossing goes vertically down the bottle.  Colorado hutches aren't common, but I am not confident to give an estimate, but if forced, I'd guess $50-80.  Digger.

Upon my grandmother's passing a few weeks ago my family and I have been sorting through here estate and have come across several old bottles. I have a question about one of them in particular. It is amber in color no labels, however, on either side the words Hemoboloids are embossed. The bottle is approx the size of a fifth and has a cork in the top. On the base of the bottle is embossed The Palisade's Mfg Co., Yonkers, NY. Any info you could provide me with would be appreciated. I am most interested in attempting to determine age of bottle and worth (if any) for the auction later this month. Thank You for your time in this matter.. Sarah Davis

I found a listing for your bottle in a 1913 Druggist Circular.  The spelling was Hemaboloids but the company was the same.  The contents were "Arsenated with Strychnine."  It was obviously some sort of blood medicine.  I'd guess a value under $20.  Digger

Looking to see if you have ever heard of this seal bottle Olive amber, ladies leg neck, quart size, pontiled, seal attached that reads "OX.R.LLN" this bottle is mint and was found in an old Maine home........ Any help would be appreciated. Thanks Dave Hilton flookout York,Maine

Dave,  I was not able to find any matching seals.  The initials make me think of the Lincoln College common room at Oxford England, but I could find no connection.  The bottle description is a bit unusual as well with the presence of the ladies leg neck.  I'd love to see a picture.  It would help date the bottle.  Digger.

Every once in a while I mess up and leave out someone's question.  If you have submitted a question and do not see it listed please simply resubmit your question and I will include it as quickly as time permits. 

Send your Bottle Questions to:  Digger Odell
Check "ASK DIGGER" for tips about what to ask to get the best results.
© 2000 Digger Odell Publications

Search this Site                 Dig Here Classifieds

HOME                          BACK TO QUESTIONS

August 2000 Questions
Ask Digger
Digger Odell Publications © 2000 
Be sure to visit the rest of my website

Hello, I have a quick question that I hope you can answer- I can't decide if the lip on this old pontiled bottle is broken or if it has always been this way from when it was made. This bottle is about 6 inches tall, is 12-sided and irregular shaped. The base has an open pontil with about a 1/2 inch kick-up, and has a faint line (seam?) right across the middle of the base. The lip is sharp/rough all the way around and has one higher pointed area- it appears broken, but the neck looks the right length to me. The very top of the lip is bulged out or a little thicker. I'd appreciate your opinion as to the age of this bottle and whether it is damaged or not. I've attached a couple of scans that I hope are helpful. Thanks! Also, thanks for your informative website- it's great! Jay

Jay, In my opinion, the bottle is broken off but this is how a bottle might have looked when broken off the blow pipe.  So I can see your dilemma.  Typically sided pontils, such as yours, have either a flared or a rolled lip.  The bulge might be marking where the mold ended and glass.  I am having a hard time imagining what the lip would have looked like. I suppose it is possible that a bottle was packed without it having had its lip finished.  Your bottle was made between  1840-1855. Digger

DEAR SIR : WE HAVE FOUND THREE BOTTLE BASES AROUND OUR FARM WE LIVE IN SOUTH AMERICA LIMA PERU. THOSE BASES HAVE THESE CONDITIONS : DARK GREEN GLASS WITH THE WORDS C W & Co WE DO NOT KNOW IF THEY ARE FROM BEER OR WINE OR OTHER. WAITING FOR YOUR HELP ALVARO MILON E.

Sounds like ale or wine bottles as the color was typical of such products.  They probably were made after 1860 since earlier bottles probably would not have the bases embossed.  I couldn't find any reference to the letters on the base, but they likely  refer to the glass company that made the bottles.  Digger

Hi, I found your e-mail address while searching the web and hope that you can offer some advice. While cleaning out some "stuff" in the garage, I came across a set of Log Cabin syrup bottles that were manufactured in commemoration of the bicentennial. They each depict (in the glass itself) a historic event related to the United states. They were never used. They are clear in color and were produced at Metro Glass in Jersey City. My wife used to work there and they gave out sets of these to some of their employees at the time. Quite honestly, we had forgotten about them until the other day. Do you know if these have any value? Or, do you know of someone who might be able to tell us? Whatever information you can provide is helpful. If you need more information, please let me know and I will be happy to provide it. Thanks, Dennis

Dennis, this question have come up every month for the last few months.  I gave more information in earlier months answers.  The bottles are very common and have little value.  Most sell for $2-3.  Digger

Hi I have a Mennen baby oil antiseptic bottle with the lid and the stuff inside its a screw on black lid the label is almost perfect its 3 inched high and1 1/2 inches wide can you tell me any thing about this bottle please thank you.

The Gerard Mennen Chemical Company of Newark, NJ first gained prominence with its Borated Talcum Toilet Powder.  They were in business at least as early as the 1890s and are still in business today.   They found their niche in child care and baby products and expanded into other toiletries.  There does not appear to be much interest in collectibles  from the company outside of their advertising which seems to sell well.  Collectors like the magazine ads, trade cards and tin signs. Check out these Modern tin signs  copies of advertising by the Mennen Company.  Your bottle may be from the 1950-60 period.  Digger

WHY AREN'T YOU 
OUT DIGGING? 

 

YOU COULD BE! 

 

pix

Digger, I was referred to your great site when I was researching a Marchand Glycozone bottle. I will include a pic of it in case it doesn't fit the other info I posted. The bottle is full and has a slight melt spot on the base with raised lettering on the back side. This bottle (flask) is about 5 3/4 inches tall. Has a twist in it. The base has a broken circle about the size of a quarter. The top is irregular and there are no seams in it. I took it away from my wife for about 10 minutes. The Pic says more than words. Wes Swisher

Wes, Glycozone was introduced about 1885 by Charles Marchand of New York City.  He established the Marchand Institute and later the Drevet Manufacturing Co.  Marchand remain president of the company until 1908 when his partners Joseph and George Rose eventually gained full control and regorganized under the name The Charles Marchand Co. about 1918.  The Drevet Manufacturing Company in addition to producing the Glycozone made several other products including Hydrogen Peroxide (comes in a cobalt bottle with Marchand's name embossed), an Eye Balsam, Hydrozone and other products.  A photo of a labeled specimen, similar to yours, appears in Richard Fike's The Bottle Book.  His bottle is earlier than yours at the top of his label it says, "An absolute cure of dyspepsia, catarrh of the stomach, cancer of the stomach, heart, blood, etc."  Most of the rest of the label is like yours except at the bottom yours says, " Reg. U.S. Pat. Off."  The wording on your label indicates to me that the bottle was produced after the Food and Drug Act of 1906.

Your second bottle appears to me to be a modern reproduction.  The poor quality of the picture makes this just a guess.  The bottle looks a bit like what has been described as a poison flask but the mouth is too wide. It is probably a Clevenger reproduction called the "Diamond Flask."  The bottle might have been blown in the 1960s. A catalog from that era gives the heights of the flask at 5 1/2 inches.  You'll find more information about the Clevengers on my article about them.  Digger

 

Hello I recently came into owning a wood crate with the words"Parke Davis" on it, on the outside - and inside is a large light greenish bottle [ crate says 5 gal. - so I guess a 5 gal bottle ] with only a small amount of a paper label showing on the neck of the bottle.. Alcohol being the first ingredient, chloroform {?}, then also horehound, and some-other herbs and spices... Can not get a good look at the bottle - it was not intended to be taken out of the crate - as I can tell via how the crate is made... BUT I can tell that the top of the neck and the lip is hand blown [ no seam there, plus the shape shows it was hand blown [ i.e.: imperfect/a bit crude shaped].... Wondering if you have any idea when pharmacist stopped bottling their items to sell, via transferring the liquids from the crated bottles into their own smaller bottles???? Is there a date when this practice was stopped? Have already e-mailed Parke Davis to try to get more info - but as of yet- no response!! And yes, the bottle has a cork [ a very desecrated one ] and still has most of the "medicine" in it! Though I would dare to call it medicine [ more like strong twice fermented booze!] Also how common is these crates and bottles? This is the first I have seen of this intact still, but would guess that it is not too uncommon since dealing with pharmacy "medicines" as such, was common years ago. Any info that you might be able to give me, would greatly be appreciated! THANKS!

The practice of building crates around demijohns or carboys was common and lasted well into the 20th century.  Sometimes the crate was constructed in such a  way as to make the pouring out of the contents easier by mounting the crate on a swivel of some sort.  I have also seen machine made bottles with packing crates built around them, acid was commonly sold this way for industrial use. These large bottles in their crates are not commonly found today but may not be easily saleable either.  The size of these items limits the number collectors willing or able to find space for them in their collections. Although Parke Davis Co. has been in business since 1866, I would suggest your bottle was made between 1890 and 1915. 

  From descriptions in the drug catalogs of the times most items were sold in smaller quantities than 5 gallons.  I found very few items sold in such large quantity.  Syrups for making root beer and other soft drinks sometimes were but quart and gallon sizes were much more common. My guess is rather than the druggist simply refilling smaller bottles, it makes more sense that they would use the ingredients in compounding their own. It would be helpful if  you were able to make out the name of the product. Digger

I am not into collecting soda bottles but have a question I bought a soda bottle from ebay because on it is my surname Loy any ideas on where to look for info on this bottle clear embossed J.H. LOY bottle. It's a large straight sided 12 oz. size. On the front and back shoulder is embossed LOY in block letters. On the heel is embossed PROP. OF J.H. LOY. On the bottom is embossed GRAHAM N.C. 12 OZ LGW. Thanks Angela Loy

The LGW on the base probably refers to the Laurens Glass Works Laurens SC. The company used LGW since 1913. I would not think you bottle was that early.  I would suggest that you contact the reference librarian at the Graham, North Carolina library.  They might have City Directories.  I'd ask if they could check the 1930, 1940, and 1950 directories for mention of the name and or company.  Depending upon their available time they might also check any other files (research, obituary, phone books) which may contain information about Mr. Loy or his bottling concern.  You might have them check the current phone book to see if any living relatives are in the area.  Often they can provide information.  If you live near there a trip there might prove fruitful.  Information such as you seek takes lots of time and patience to uncover.  Digger

Hi Digger, While we were out in Frederick Md. We were walking in the woods and came across a old coke bottle the top looks like a regular coke bottle but the bottom is square. I t has the words soda water contents 6 fluid oz around the middle of the bottle and at the bottom it reads property of coca cola bottling co Pat. DES. no.70281 and on the very bottom of the bottle reads Frederick MD.with a 3 and a 5 on it if there is anything you could tell me about this bottle thank you Lynn

Technically, your bottle  is not a Coca-Cola bottle, that is it ,never held the product Coca-Cola. It actually was used for various flavors bottled by local Coca-Cola bottlers. These so-called "flavor bottles" were produced in various designs and with a number of different names including Buck Brand Soda Water, Big Chief, Fanta and others.  One of the more common ones is sometimes called the "star' flavor bottle named for the embossed stars on the bottle.  These bottles are not much sought after by Coca Cola collectors. The Coca-Cola embossing  is usually in-block letters instead of the traditional Coca-Cola script lettering. Your bottle with a Design Patent Number of 70281 would have been made after 1927. These bottles often sell in the $3-8 range.  Digger

Update from a reader: Thanks for participating. Digger

On page 193 of BJ Summers price guide (the 1999 version) this "star" bottle is listed for $65. It is also shown on the back cover of his later book (2001) altho I didn't take the time to look it up in it. I am fortunate enough to have three of these bottles, and my friends who are collectors have for years tried to get one of them from me, even at the point to trying to steal one, so it surprised me to see that you said the bottles are "not desirable" among Coke collectors. I have not seen but two or three of these bottles on the shelves of any antique shop over a period of many years, and when I did see one, the least I ever saw one for was $55. So again, your value of $3-8 surprised me. I would buy them all day long for that price range. All the "flavor" bottles in my collection are priced pieces, because they have history, plus there would not be so many of them in circulation. It has been my experience that collectors do want the flavor bottles, if nothing more than a 'go-with" their branded ones. Just like in James Ayers price guide, it lists one of the flavor bottles used by Pepsi as rare, and gives a value of $85. So if these flavor bottles were not "desirable" among collectors, then why do they value higher than many of the branded bottles? Just a thought,
A. Sathe

I recently found this bottle @ a work site that was a dump site for Freeport, Texas. It is a: Scott's Emulsion Cod Liver Oil with Lime & Soda ; it has a raised/embossed Trade Mark with a fisherman carrying a cod over his shoulder. Do you have any idea how old this bottle might be? It is in perfect condition but does not have a lid. I also have a Vaseline jar from Chesebrough, New York. Do you know what "Marinello" is? I'm assuming it is a crème perfume or face cream due to the jar resembling a cold cream jar. Thanks for your time and knowledge!!! Sincerely, Beverly Brock

Blue Seal Vaseline was the product sold in the Chesebrough Vaseline bottles which are common in turn of the century dumps and privies.  The product was invented in 1888.

You'll find the Scott's Emulsion question in a number of different earlier months of "Ask Digger." Yours sounds like it might be machine and from the 1920-30 period.  I am pretty sure I have covered the Chesebrough Vaseline question before as well.  Robert A. Chesebrough, a New York chemist learned how to convert a by-product of oil drilling operations into a wound treatment.    The product was widely distributed under the name "Blue Seal Vaseline Petroleum Jelly."  In 1908, the cork top was replaced by a screw cap.  Chesebrough died in 1933. The product is still available.  I couldn't find a listing for "Marinello." Digger

Dear Digger, I found this bottle while digging at work. I don't know too much about old bottles other than what I read briefly on your web site. I am just curious to see some kind of background or history, and possibly monetary value. Here are some approximate dimensions that may help- height- 6 1/4" bottom sphere- 1 5/8" top sphere- 1 5/16" square tube center- 1" Also, I can see seams on either side so I'm assuming that it has been molded, and the only writing I see on it is the number 3 embossed on the bottom. I sent this picture in hopes that it might help. Any information you can send me will be greatly appreciated. Curious.

I am guessing that the bottle is food related, possibly a sauce of some kind.  I doubt that it has much monetary value.  Most collectors are looking for earlier bottles.  yours appears to be from the 1930-40 period.  Maybe a reader will know.  Digger.

 

Dear Digger, Recently I have been finding beautiful bottles only to have them crack I guess to temperature changes. Have you had this problem and do you have any solutions. Thanks ,Steve

Steve,  I have a sad and similar story to relate.  We dug an emerald green, iron pontil, 12 sided "Jones Empire Ink," a really valuable bottle worth in the multiple thousands of dollars.  I took it home and washed it and set it on the shelf.  A week or so later, when a friend was visiting, I took it out and handed to him to show it off and he said, " Did you know the bottle was cracked?"  I didn't - and upon examining it I found not a small crack but a large unmistakable crack running down one side and around the base.  Such was this crack that I could not have missed it while washing the bottle.  I have over the years heard of such things as bottles spontaneously going "pop" in collector's cases without any apparent cause.  I have also heard that if a bottle when it is made is not annealed properly, there will be much tension in the glass and any small change in temperature or surrounding might cause damage as mentioned above.  Diggers who dig in cold winter weather are careful to immediately wrap their finds (which underground have been a steady 50 degree or so) to protect them from extreme temperature changes.  I can imagine the same thing happening in very warm weather.  If you are concerned, wrap your finds in the hole or keep them in the shade to let them warm up or cool off gradually. Leaving them in the car in hot weather may also be dangerous. Likewise displaying bottles in windows may expose them to dangerous temperature variation.  This is especially true for dark colored bottles which will heat up quickly. On the other hand, it might be in our excitement, we just missed the damage which was there along.  Digger

I found a small clear bottle (glass) with wonder bubbles embossed on it. I know the wonder bubbles product is still being made however I never remembered it coming in glass bottles I was wondering if you knew when they quit using glass and went to plastic. Also is there a category for children's bottles. And last is this bottle rare or quite common. Thanks deb

Deb, I do not know the date but I'd guess your bottle dates to the 1950s or earlier. The only categories for children's bottles would be nursing bottles. Most machine made bottles of the sort you found would not be rare, especially in light of the fact the company is still in business.  They must have been successful. I'd guess a value of $2-3.  Digger  

 

I found a bottle and I wanted to find out what I could. can you help? it's amberish in color, stands up about 5 inches, is square, with rounded edges. and has "Wyeth 205" on the bottom.  It does have a short round neck, about a inch long.  Any help I would appreciate thank you Brian Morse

John and Frank Wyeth started their chemical company in Philadelphia about 1860.  They produced products such as Wyeth's Coca Leaves Aromatic Essence, Wyeth's Pepsin, Wyeth's Pancreatin, Wyeth's Linseed Oil and Heroin, Wyeth's Cod Liver Oil and Hypophosphites, Wyeth's Catnip and Fennel, Wyeth's Quino-Ferrum and hundreds and hundreds of others than would have been bottled.  The amber color would have protected the contents from light.  Digger

I have an old Stroh beer bottle that I got at a store for 5 bucks...it is clear with a seam on both sides with the words "STROH"..."DETROIT"..."and "REGISTERED" at the top of the wide part of the bottle . no label and the words contents 12 1/2 fluid ounces on the bottom. Any idea how old it could be? thanks

The best cue to the age is the type of lip.  A blob top would date roughly around 1900.  The bottles produced from about 1900-prohibition would have a crown top but might have hand tooled lips.  Post prohibition bottles would have crown tops and be machine made. The company has been in business from 1882 until the present.  Your bottle is very likely to date after prohibition and possibly is from the 1840-60 period.  Digger

Good day, I am trying to date a pocket knife through an embossed Whiskey bottle on the case. The bottle has the inscription Monopole Rye Whiskey on it. Any information on the age of the brand would be helpful, Thank you. Dave.

Dave, sorry but I was not able to locate any information.  Hopefully a reader will help out.  Digger

Can you tell me where to find antique pickle jars (preferably blue)? 

If by blue you mean cobalt blue, then I think you are out of luck.  I have never seen one.  Typically they come in clear, amber and aqua.  The best place to get high quality collectible pickles would be at GlassWork Auctions.  The above photo shows some 1870-1890 pickles.  Bottles such as those with original labels are rare.  Digger

 

Dear Digger, As I was fishing in a local stream in Pennsylvania I looked down and saw a corner of a bottle. So I bent down and dug it up. I pulled out a Mishler's Herb Bitters Bottle. I know all about Bitters Bottles from your web sight. Here are the specifications of this bottle. The writing on two sides reads Mishler's Herb Bitters. The third side reads Tablespoon Graduation With measurements reading up to 15oz. The 4th side is flat and has no writing I'm guessing this was where the label went (there is none it is worn off.) This is a rectangular bottle with a square bottom. The bottom of this bottle reads Pat Feb 6 66, Stoerkel's Crnd (this last part was hard to make out but the Patent date was very clear.) In the center of the bottom is a horseshoe type figure with an oval inside it. The height of this bottle (including the neck) is 9" in. The bottom of this bottle is a 21/2"in by a 21/2"in square. The sides with the writing on them are indented about an 1/8 of an inch, with a ridge separating them from the next side. This is a rectangular bottle with a square base. This is an amber colored bottle. The bottle itself is in good condition no stains or damage. I don't know the terms for the mouth of the bottle so I will describe it best I can. From the base of the neck of the bottle to the mouth of the bottle is 17/8"in long. When I wrap the tape measure around the neck of the bottle at the base the measurement is 37/8"in around . The same process at the mouth of the bottle is 33/8. I can't find any information on the internet about my bottle. I'm hoping that you can tell me the history and most important of all the value of the bottle. I think you have a really great web site and THANKS for reading about my bottle.

Your bottle is common but still a great find.  The difficult to read embossing says "Stoeckels Grad Pat." This refers to the graduations marked on the side of the bottle.  The apparent inventor of this bitters was one B. Mishler of Pittsburgh, PA. who began putting it about 1869.  A short time later, the product was purchased by Dr. S. B. Hartman (of Peruna fame...see other months for more details) together with a couple of partners.  They turned it into a gigantic seller.  In fact, one variant of the Herb Bitters has a panel marked Dr. S. B. Hartman & Co. Your bottle is known in amber and shades of yellow. These days, amber examples bring $40-50.  Digger

Dear Digger, I am a bottle collector and I am stumped!! I found a bottle in a bottle dump in upstate NY (Albany area). The bottle is a little cobalt blue, no taller than 1 Inch and has a screw neck. On one side it is embossed with the name "Vicks" and on the other side "drops". I think it was perhaps a sample given by a doctor in the 1930's. Have you ever seen such a bottle and do you have any information about it? Many thanks, Joyce

Other readers in previous months have asked about this bottle.  They are quite common, but collectible. Check earlier months for more information.  Digger

Hi Digger, I found a old Purex bottle, about a quart in size, and it has a cork that say's Purex in the top. It is amber or brown in color. I would like to know it's value. Thank You. Gene

Gene, you win the Purex prize for this month.* Purex was a brand of bleach.  Your bottle is very very common.  The bottles have very little value.  I gave a bit more information in earlier months.  Digger. 

(*No actual cash value )

I have found a bottle about 8oz blue/aqua color with a metal locking cap. on the outside it says M.B. & company Co. 145 west 35th street N.Y.1861. could you tell me what this is worth thanks. Ron Arkay

Ron, your bottle is a soda bottle.  The style is known as a squat soda.  Several other bottles from this same company are known.  One aqua example similar to yours is embossed "M. B. & Co. (in block lettering) - 145 West 35th St. N. Y. - 1862."  A second bottle in light green is embossed M. B. & Co. - 97 West 35th St. N.Y.  I'd estimate, in mint condition (no stain, scratches, dings, nicks or chips etc..) for the bottle to be worth $35-45.  The presence of a date is one of the nice features of your bottle.  Digger.

can you supply me with any info. on a torpedo bottle? light green in color, embossed with "Ross's" on one side, and "Belfast" on the other side. rounded bottom with a blob top. any history or value info??? thanks!!!!

Your bottle is a round bottom soda.  The above registered trademark gives some background about these very common but appealing bottles.  You'll find a fair number of questions about the Ross's and similar bottles in past months.  Value is $10-15.  One with a label like the label shown above would bring four to five times that amount.  Digger

 

Digger, I have found conflicting information on a recent acquisition. I have a medium amber bitters bottle. Markings include embossed apples on 3 sides and Berring's Apple Bitters with PHIL (A). The bottle is roughly 9 3/4" tall. It also has Wheaton NJ on bottom with possibly a reproduced pontil. I'm pretty sure it's a repro, but found some conflicting info. Can you help? Is it worth anything at all? Thanks, Deb

Deb, your bottle is a fantasy bottle.  No such antique bottle with that embossing exists. Wheaton Glass of Millville New Jersey produced your bottle in the 1970s.  The bottle was inspired by the old bottle shown at the left.  The embossing reads: " Perrrin's - Apple - Ginger - Phila - Perrines (motif of an apple).  An original would sell for $250-300.  Digger

I'm not a collector, but this one may get me started if I can find anyone who can tell me something about it. Found this bottle under about six inches of dirt and duff on the edge of the woods behind our house in Tulsa when we moved in 15 years ago. The house was built in 1937, so I suspect the bottle dates from that approximate period. Condition is generally good with only a few pinhead-sized bruises, no chips or cracks. It has light scale on the inside and needs cleaning. It is an aqua-green, crown-top (ABM) soda (I guess) bottle (7-5/8" tall). Here's the good part: it is embossed on the side with "HOME BOTTLING CO. TULSA, OKLA." and has a swastika (yes, a swastika) both on the side and embossed in the bottom. There are some machine numbers: "3197D" on the side at the bottom edge of the bottle and some undecipherable markings that look like three faint zeros just above the machine (mold?) numbers. Perhaps you could refer me to a local collector who might be able to shed some light on what this bottle is about. Would someone at the local museums be able to help? Please advise. Kenneth L. Frakes

Kenneth, believe it or not the swastika was a popular symbol, often associated with good luck prior to its adoption by the Germans around WWII.  The symbol has its roots in antiquity.  I have seen a number of bottles and trademarks incorporating it in the design.  One example is shown below.  One thing is very likely and that is that the Home Bottling Co. stopped using that symbol by the time the Second World War started.  Going with your theory it might be very close in age to 1937.  The Tulsa Library reference desk might be able to help.  Digger

 

Do you have a pic of the 5 Gal. Ka:Ton:Ka jug in your Indian bottle book? Have you seen one & do you know where I can buy one? Any help would be great. I live in Corry, Pa. where they came from but the only one I've seen was in the last Bottle & Glass magazine. I want one desperately for my Corry collection. Don from Corry...

Don, I apologize for the poor picture.   I have seen only two for sale in 30 years.  I expect you'd have to pay a great deal for one if you could find one.  My guess would $3000+. Digger  

I am looking to find the price for an Avon auburn boatail speedster I am really having a hard time finding the price for it . whatever help or advice you give would be greatly appreciated .

I checked Ebay today and found 3 for sale.  Two had bids one at $7.50 and the other at $9.99.  Digger.

Digger; Bookmarked your site a while back. Found it very informative and well-organized. I am a metal detectorist, but last year I ran into an unusually nice bottle situation and fortunately capitalized on it, so have been more interested in bottles recently. Ever hear of a Brandimist? About 1926 or so. or "Sellers Since 1919" ACL bottle? These were a couple of my finds there. Anyway why I am writing is this. I've started doing the Ebay thing, buying mostly small glass items for resale on Ebay. I bought this one thing that I thought was a piece of Japanese crockery, only to get it home and read "James B. Beam Imp(???) J New York" on the bottom of a tall cyclindrical stoneware bottle, about 13" high and about 4 " in diameter. I think this is an old-as-dirt James Beam stoneware bottle from about 1900. The bottom is unglazed, which from what I've been able to find normally means pre-1900, while the top is more indicative of post-1900, so I figure it is a transitional of right about 1900. It has a light green glaze. It was maybe bottled locally from barrels in New York? Any idea where I could go for info on this? I also found a pristine "citrate magnesia" from around 1880-1890 based on the mold lines, only to discover that apparently there was a whole set of products calling themselves "citrate magnesia." Have you ever heard of a club or book specializing in these? Have a picture of these if this is confusing. Thanks Kevin Mulrooney

 I want to correct an error on the Beam bottle.  I only know for sure that it says IM   J on the middle line. I think I picked up thinking it also said P from some post a guy made to a Jim Beam collectibles forum to ID the apparent exact same bottle.  As far as I could tell, nobody answered him.  The impression appears to have been punched in by perhaps a wood punch.  The "James B. Beam" that curls across the top is very clear, but about half of "New York" is either smoothed over or not depressed deep enough.  Almost all of the center line is either obliterated or poorly impressed, but IM can be clearly read on the left and J on the far right.  At the bottom of the Beam bottle in the pic is the stamp.  It appears to say 0.7 which is followed by a fancy mark that looks a bit like a script L but I'm sure doesn't stand for liters but perhaps some arcane 19th century volume symbol.  I'll try to draw a bitmap showing what it looks like.  The bottom is unglazed but has a few splatters of the light green glaze on it. A series of fine cracks run around the side of the bottom, attesting to the age. Thanks Kevin Mulrooney

Kevin,  I have not heard of your ACL sodas.  The citrate of magnesia is a common bottle.  They were made from the pontil age well into the 20th century. I have seen them in a wide range of colors as well.  To my knowledge, there is no book on such bottles.  With respect to the Beam, (and I am no expert in this area), my opinion is the item is much newer than the turn of the century.  I would guess it to be modern in spite of the age cracks. The form is wrong for the age you are suggesting.  I found a reference to what appears to be your bottle in and old copy of Hugh Cleveland's Bottle Price Guide.  He lists it under imported Beams.  Your bottle contained Beameister Wine and was imported from Germany  They are listed in five colors, brown, white, light green, dark green.  the come in two sizes 10 !/2" and 8 1/2".  Without the label, it probably has little value. I'd estimate under $10.  Digger.

Dear Digger, We have a Dodge and Olcott cobalt blue glass bottle, 2/3 full of "OIL ANISE, STAR...U.S.P.XI". It is about 10"high and holds one pound net. The lower label reads "Put up expressly for Brunswig Drug Company, Los Angeles, California." The cork top says D & O was established in 1798. Any idea of the value? Many thanks!

The Brunswig Drug Company was in business around the turn of the century.  I found it listed in 1913.  They were proprietors of probably a number of products among which was Sharp's Cod Liver Oil.  I found no mention of Dodge and Olcott.  With a good label a non-machine bottle such as yours should be worth in the range of $40-$80.  I am basing this on its size, color and age.  Digger.

Dear MR. Digger, I have an old amber colored gallon jug, with the word bleach outlined, wrote on the top just below the neck on both sides, It is a screw top bottle and has a two fingered handle, It is from around 1955 to 1959 I think. It is 12 inches high, It also has a grained texture, On the bottom it has the markings 7 <O> 60 ((in the O it has the letter I in it)). Under the markings their is also the number 2. IF you could let me know how much this bottle might be worth and any other history on it, I would really appreciate it. Thank you Conni,

Connie, if you check previous months you'll find some mention of various bleach bottles.  There just aren't any collectors in this category and there is a huge over supply of the bottles so the value isn't there.  You'll find these items in antique malls and flea markets.  I expect few of them actually sell. Digger

Dear Sirs; I recently came across a bottle found in an excavation site in Pittsburgh, Pa. The bottle is blue in color and has the name Weiss Bottling Co. Baltimore, Md. Any information would be helpful. Thank you for your time on this matter. Mitchell A Zieglar

I found two "Weiss" companies selling beer in Baltimore The Weiss Beer Brewery around 1873 and the other Washington Bottling Company, Weiss Beer Brewery from 1911-1913.  Your bottle might well be a soda bottle, but it could be associated with one of the above concerns.  The method of manufacture and form would help date it.  Digger.

I found a Duraglas bottle at my grandfathers home site. I am interested in knowing how old the bottle is. Duraglas is written in script on the edge near the bottom. On the bottom is 15, symbol (Diamond and circle with the letter I inside) and 6 at the end. Underneath the symbol is an 8. Underneath that appears E1595. It looks like a syrup or vinegar bottle. There are 10 grooves at the top of the bottle. Thanks for your help.

hey digger, i have a duraglas mug which has a Hawaiian embossed logo on it, looks like brass rings attached to a wooden handle. the raise lettering on the bottom side says 4/5 quart and the bottom has duraglas in script, a duraglas symbol, on the left side of the symbol is a 3, on the bottom is a 12., and on the right is a 5 is it worth anything? or is it just a novelty item? Carl

The diamond and circle with the I refer to Owens-Illinois, Inc. Toledo.  They began making Duraglas in 1940.  I believe you'll find more information in one of the earlier months. Carl, Hawaiian items are very collectible.  Digger

I am a collector of George Washington items (late 18th through mid-19th century prints and some Washington bicentennial pieces) and I frequently find Wheaton Bottles in a variety of colors of Washington which I continually pass up because I don't know their origin....when they were issued and whether they are reproductions. Are they Washington bicentennial items from 1932 or were there originals prior to that and the 1932 pieces are reproductions. There also is another Washington bottle that resembles a Washington wearing a tri-corner hat that comes in various colors. Again, I pass on purchasing this item because of my ignorance on the subject. Can you help me with any information on these two pieces of glassware. Thank you.

Simon's Centennial Bitters
Drawing from Bill Ham's Bitter's Bottles.

The bottles marked Wheaton bottles are less than 30 years old.  The earliest and most sought after of the Washington figurals is the "Simon's Centennial Bitters."  The trademark was  patented December 14, 1875 be Bernard Simon of Scranton, Pennsylvania.  The original comes in amber and aqua and has a double collar mouth.  Reproductions abound.  Some quite good and others obviously poor copies.  There are pontiled specimens and some highly unusual colors.  Some of the better reproduction were made by the Clevengers.  You'll find articles on my site's home page under "reproductions" which will give you more information about Wheaton and Clevenger bottles.  Your comments about the 1932 bicentennial may be significant and the time period fits with when many early reproduction bottles (flasks and bitters) were made. Digger

 

I found a Kerr glass canning jar with the word K(in script)err (in small print, also in script)"self sealing" "wide mouth" "mason" are are upper case and raised print on the face of the jar. On the bottom are the words KERR GLASS MFG CO SAND SPRINGS OKLA around the base, and in the center, it says PAT 2 AUG 31 1915, also in raised print. Do you know anything about this jar? A search of the web leads me to no useful information. Thank You for any time that you might put into this effort. Gerry

I found listing for a number of similar jars in the Red Book of Fruit Jars #7.  All with a value of $1-2 in clear.  The jar closest to yours also has the words "Trademark Reg," embossed on the front.  The base is the same except it lacks the number "2."  Digger

I've found a small clear glass bottle-- more of a vial than a bottle -- with the legend : "Keep me cold and I'll stay hot" Any ideas what this was?? Michael Knight --

Your got me on this one Michael.  Perhaps a reader will help.  Digger

I have a Simmonds nabob whiskey I think a BIM it has a circle around Simmonds the bottle has a crack in the side bottom and in the top no chips , amber in color ,

Your email did not come through or had some rather unusual scripting so I am not sure what you are wanting if you resend it, I'll try to help.  digger

Heya are any American bourbon whiskey bottles from united distillers ltd Vancouver Canada worth much ? one I have is reddish amber with a rainbow stain inside which reads American bourbon whiskey (embossed) and has an embossing of a scroll & diamond shape on front.... a big wheat grain and a shield on back (had a label I think) also has a row of wheat or corn on each side..4 stalks each side the bottom reads united distillers. Vancouver reg #9135 a <d> symbol and a # 3 is about 7 1/4 inches looks like maybe an applied top??? and seam stops just about top is this a find or just junk for a yard sale *L thanks for your time digger.. adono

Adono,  It sounds like a collectible item to me.  It has good embossing, a picture and the word American.  It might appeal to Western collectors, Whiskey Collectors and Canadian collectors.  I feel a little uncertain about putting a value on it.  Send a picture if you can and I'll post it here.  Digger.

 

DEAR DIGGER, I HAVE AN OLD COCA COLA BOTTLE THAT I FOUND IN MY YARD. MAYBE YOU CAN IDENTIFY THE YEAR IT WAS MADE. EMBOSSING: "COCA COLA" "BOTTLING WORKS" "REGISTERED" "ROCHESTER,NY" (ON BASE) "561" SIZE: 7 OZ.

 Aqua straight sided Coke bottles like yours were used from about 1905-1922.  You do not mention if the bottle is machine made which would help narrow that range down further.  If it were not machine made one could probably place it's age prior to World War I.  If it is machine made then the age is probably between 1914-1922. Digger

 

I don't know if you can help, but I found an old bottle up in the attic of "Z-L antiseptic mouthwash & gargle" by Norwich Pharmacal Company. I was just wondering if you knew how old it might be? It still has liquid in it! The label is still on it, but is crackling up, how do you preserve it? Thank you! Amy

The Norwich Pharmacal Company is best known for some of the handsome poison bottles they produced.  They were operating prior to the turn of the century.  I was not able to find your product listed in sources prior to 1917 and suspect it may be later.  You do not describe the mouth and lip of the bottle which would allow me to help you date it.  Digger.

Just found my first bottle - out on a hike. I have some information and all I really want to know is the general age of the bottle before I donate it to a local trails club for historical purposes. I found a bottle with the following characteristics: -Smooth base with embossing with the words "Vicks" and "VA-TRO-NOL " the number "8" is small and found above the letters "RO" and there is an embossed triangle in the middle of the base -deep cobalt color -side seams run to the top of the tip (AMB?) - -it is about 2 1/2" X 1 1/4"

The Vick's Chemical Company introduced VA-TRO-NOL in 1931 for the nose and throat. It was still advertised in the 1980s.  Digger

 

Dear Digger: I recently acquired this bottle and cannot find anything that leads me in the direction of its type or use, much less its value. It is pontiled, is 6 3/4 inches tall, the base is 3 1/2 inches (but is not evenly round), there are 16 swirls to the right, the flared lip is 1 5/8 inches across (and not of uniform shape), it is heavily bubbled, and has stretch marks. There are no mold marks or embossing on the bottle. It has no scratches, chips, cracks, or fractures. I have attached a picture for you to view in hopes you can tell me something regarding its age, origin, use, and/or value. Any help you can provide will be greatly appreciated. Sincerely, Wayne Regl

Wayne,  It is clearly a hand blown bottle but I am suspicious about its age and origin. First of all the form is unlike anything found in early American glass yet the bottle has some characteristics of pieces from that period.  The presence of 16 swirls, the wide flared lip and the color and pontil are adapted from what one might find on a Mid-western (Ohio) piece.  The large number of bubbles is not characteristic of glass from that period.  That is not to say that one cannot find example with many "seed bubbles," but rather that glass blowers of the period tried to avoid that and preferred a clear glass (it was stronger) and they generally found that if they drew glass from the top of the vat they would get more bubbles than glass drawn from the middle or bottom of the vat. The bubbles being less dense would rise to the top of the molten mixture.  I was sorry I had to crop your excellent photographs.  The photo showing the base of the bottle, from what I can see, shows no wear on the base.  If the bottle were an early piece you'd expect to find wear on the base. All said, I would think this piece was made within the last 30 years as a decorative item.  It could be Mexican or European.  The type and quality of glass reminds me of Mexican glass.  I'd estimate a value of $20-25.  Digger

I found an old glass beer bottle that reads: C Conrad & Co's, Original Budweiser US Patent N9 6376. Can you tell me when it was bottled and its worth, if any. Thank you.

Prior to 1890, laws governing the production of beer prohibited brewers from bottling beer on at the same location as it was brewed.  Many brewers wanting to provide the public with bottled beer enlisted the help of bottlers.   Budweiser, which was introduced in 1876 was bottled by Carl Conrad & Co. the bottler chosen by Anheuser- Busch.  C. Conrad & Co. appears to have been in business from 1876-1883. I do not feel confident to give an estimate of value with seeing the bottle. Digger

I found a bottle with the word topaz written on it can you help me find a date for it

I need more information.  Check the "Ask Digger" link at the bottom of this page. Digger

Hello. I have a question concerning two wine bottles. These bottles sat on top of my mothers fridge for 38 years! And now they are one mine. What are they? One is a donkey sitting in a chair. The donkey has on a hat which appears to be a political hat. He has a yellow bow tie and belt with gray pants. The chair is on a base. I would suspect from the appearance of the paint they were hand painted. There are no words on the bottle other than the sticker "Vintage 1965" "Imported by Southern Liquor, Inc. Louisville, Kentucky" The other one is the same description except it is an elephant. The donkey contained a red wine and the elephant a white wine. On the bottom of the bottles there are different markings. The donkey has a mark in the bottle. It is a "U" shaped branch with a shield in the center topped by a crown. The elephant has a sticker marking which reads "C.A.S.A Cameri (Novara) Made in Italy. They had cork plugs. They are both glazed and in good to excellent condition. If you have any answers for me or can get me started on my journey I would appreciate it very much. In turn if you ever need to know anything about American Sign Language I would be happy to assist you! Thank, Cyndi

I was not able to locate any information about your bottles which were probably made for the 1968 election.  Maybe a reader can help.  Digger

Hi I have a small collection of Wheaton NJ colored glass bottles. They might be from the 60's and 70's. They are small bottles with Wheaton NJ on the bottom they are shaped like an ear of corn, ink , several faces of different American presidents, and more. Do you know how I can get more information regarding actual age and value as well as history of these bottles? Thanks again Linda B

Linda, you'll find numerous references to these through out the past months of Ask Digger Questions.  Also check the article on my site about reproductions.  The Wheaton Glass company is still in business.  The first group of Presidential Flasks were made in 1967 and production continued through 1974.  More than a half million were produced.  The Kennedy Canteen-type was among the first produced in 1967.  More than 55,000 were produced.  They originally sold for $5.  With respect to the other bottles in this series the numbers produced vary from a low of about 21,000 for the green Andrew Jackson to a high of over 90,000 for the Lincoln made in topaz with a satin finish.  In any case none could be considered rare. Digger.

Five gallon water bottles in wooden cases are they worth collecting and if so how much are they worth. Lyle

Some certainly are.  It depends upon if they are embossed or the cases have identifying marks. With no markings they would have $10-20 for bottles 70-90 years old.  

Dear digger, I’m new to bottle collecting and have a few questions for you on some bottles I have acquired the first is a soda ( bludwine bottling co. Orangeburg S. C. 6.5 fluid ounces) all embossed , the spelling of bludwine is blduwine. Seam is like modern day soda, color is greenish aqua, height is 7 5/8 " . The second is a ( Wyeth's beef juice , u.s. hospital size 100 c.c. ) all embossed. color is amber, height is 4 1/2" , smooth base , seam line stop's 1/2" below lip. The third is a ( L. pierre valligny or vallicny La coutte-a-coutte New York ) all embossed on front panel color is amber with almost a yellowish and a reddish tint to it . height is 6 1/8 " smooth base , mold line stops 1/2" below the lip. Also has what looks like screw threads at base of lip, maybe for a dose cup. Any info on these bottles (Value,age, rarety,etc. ) would be greatly appreciated. I will send pictures. I have a few others I have questions about but will write later about, I like to go out and hunt for and dig for bottles and do once in a while find some really neat bottles. I at some time in the near future will purchase your secrets to privy digging, and your bottle cleaning plans . Thank you very much, Donnie Mull

Bludwine was a soft drink apparently bottled in S.C. and other parts of the country in the early part of the 20th century. One bill head dated 1916 for the Bludwine Bottling Co. of Bridgeport, CT. indicated it was a subsidiary of Coca Cola . I found another reference in the Butts Co. Georgia Progress February 19, 1909 in an article, L. Norsworthy, manager of the Empire Bottling Works, states that the works turns out an average of 550 cases (13,200 bottles) of soft drinks a month. The article further states that Empire had exclusive manufacture and sale in this territory of Bludwine and Wiseola,  two very popular soft drinks. Apparently permission to manufacture the drink was sold to a wide number of bottlers across the country.  I found at least one collector advertising that he wanted "Bludwine" bottles.  I'd estimate the value around $8-10.
Your Wyeth bottle is another turn of the century piece.  An earlier question this month has some information about the company. The value is probably $4-8.  I wasn't able to locate anything about your third bottle.  Digger

 

I recently purchased a clear glass bottle with the following characteristics: The 5/16" raised letters on the front are ARMOUR AND COMPANY CHICAGO. Above the letters is a monogram surrounded by a double circle with what appears to be the company's initials. A smaller monogram appears on both sides and on the copper screw top. The height of the bottle is 7 1/4" to the top of the screw top. The bottle is BIM and the width below the neck is 3 3/4" tapering to 3 1/2" at the bottom. The bottom of the glass has a number 2 in the center. This glass is in perfect condition. I am curious as to what it contained and its approximate value. Thank you very much for your time. Gayle Blunier

Gayle, Phillip Danforth Armour, founder of the firm, made his residence in Chicago in 1875.  A decade earlier he had partnered with John Plankinton, the largest pork packer in Milwaukee and by 1867 they had moved operations to Chicago for its superior rail capabilities.  His best product "Armour Star Ham" was first put up in 1877.  They produced a great many products but there main business was meat packing.  They filed for trademarks for lard, bacon, ham and all manner of cured and pickled meats. They sold "meat juice" (see the question above), soups, chicken products, salad oil, digestine ferments.  They made canned foods as well mince meat, peanut butter, jams and jellies, grape juice.  Through research and development with the volumes of inedible materials, they eventually produced sutures, strings for instruments and tennis rackets, glue,  brushes, glycerine and pharmaceutical from animals glands. By 1898 they had over $150 million dollars in business in canned meats.  It is hard to tell what your bottle might have contained.  Most food related bottles often do not bring the glamous prices that many other categories.  Without a label or clue to the contents, I'd estimate the value under $10.  Digger.

 

Examples in color are rare

hello, I have a 10'' aqua blue, blob top, smooth base bottle in very good condition. Buffalo Lithia Water. It has a woman sitting in a chair pouring from a pitcher. To the side it says Natures Materia Medica.On the base is C 10. Any help on date and value would be appreciated. Thank You, Craig Lee.

Craig,  Your bottle is well known and was popular from the 1890s and into the twentieth century.  The bottles usually bring $35-45 these days.  A few examples are known in deep teal color like the at the left and sell for a great deal more. The Buffalo Springs and company were in Virginia.  The trademark is shown below.  In their application they indicated the company began about 1897. Digger

 

Hi. I'm hoping you night be able to offer some advice. My husband has a WWII coffee bottle that is precious to him. My son, not realizing it's worth, tore the label off. What would be the best way to try to reapply the label? It is very old and fragile. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Thank-you.

The presence of the label makes a huge difference in the value of such articles.  I'd think an adhesive like wall paper glue might work. Glues like Elmer's often will cause wrinkles.    You may be able to get the label wet without hurting it.  Rubber cement might be another option.  Digger

Hi, I recently came across a bottle that has been ID as an avian (bird) water bottle, circa 1800-1850. It has a pontil (?) mark on the bottom (where it was snapped off the rod?). It basically looks like a beaker with a tube coming out of the bottom, for small birds to drink from. Although I know about civil war related artifacts, I know little to nothing about bottles, and just happened upon this at a civil war show. I wanted to know how to find out more information on this type bottle, and also a rough value of it if you don't mind. It is in good cond (no breaks) except the top APPEARS to have a tiny piece broken off...could this have been a hook, or is that just the way these were made? (At that point it also has a small flat protrusion , like to grasp it with. I am truly fascinated with this piece and would like to know more about it. Thanks! Thank you, Butch Holcombe

Butch,  over the years I have dug a number of bird related glass objects but nothing like you are describing. A picture would be helpful to further comment.  Digger

Hello I have a small clear bottle, mid sized pop bottle shape, which has "Marsh's" embossed on the glass. Could you tell me what it is from and from where? Thank you! Sherri Gallant

Sherri, I found  6 or 7 oz. Marsh's soda bottle from Portmouth, Ohio from about 1920.  Digger.

Hi. I was wondering if you had any idea if this bottle would be worth anything. It is a whiskey bottle. It's called Myopia Club. H.W. Huguley Co. 134 Canal St. Boston. It has a certificate of analysis on the back dated Boston, Jan. 22, 1902 written by Geo. W. Miles. Please help. My husband can't find anything on it. Thank you, Monique

I expect the bottle has value.  I hesitate to give an opinion without a description or picture of the bottle.  Digger. 

Dear Mr. Odell, I recently acquired a heart shaped bottle that I cannot find any information on, and would appreciate any help you can offer. The bottle is 5" high in the shape of a heart, the width across the heart is 4" and the thickness of the bottle is 2"1/4 inches. The base is rectangular, recessed smooth with the words "inne dispensables" when I used this description on the internet a "Norman Rockwell inne dispensables" bottle appeared which was nothing like mine. It is clear glass with seams running from the base to the underside of the neck on each side. The neck has an extended ring around (which if I cut through one side would look like a "P") that measures 1" inside diameter. It also (the neck) seems to have been made in two parts but the joints do not line up with the joints on the bottle. The surface of the heart is very uneven with bumps and there are thick and thin areas, also uneven surfaces inside that can be felt with my finger. There are also several air bubbles ranging in size up to a "1/4 inch, One large bubble has a side joint running right through it. I would really appreciate any information you could give me. Regards, Michael Ingleston

From your description of the way the mouth is made it sounds much like an early machine made bottle.  Possibly dating to around 1910.  The bottle sounds like it is probably a cologne bottle.  I was not able to find anything about yours.  Digger.

I would appreciate any information on a jar I have. It's white. The shape is square. The word "MUSTARD" is on one side. Instead of raised letters, they are sunken. The mouth of the bottle is round in which a screw -on lid would fit. From the base of the jar to the top of mouth, it is approximately 3 1/8 inches tall. Thanks for your time. Andrea

I am not sure what I can tell you.  The bottle could be from the 1940-50 period.  It probably has little monetary value without the lid or label.  I am not familiar with the bottle and cannot identify the company.  Digger

I recently purchased old stock from a liquor store that went out of business approx. 15 years ago. I have many unusual unopened bottles. How can I find out how much each one is worth? One in particular is a full bottle of ARDO cherry Italian wine. It is produced and bottled in Italy by LUXARDO-PADOVA. It is a 5/8 quart bottle that has a Kaiser clock that is embedded through the middle of the bottle. The clock came with a winding key and states it was made in West Germany. It is in the original box but I can not find any date stamp on anything. Are you familiar with this bottle? If so, could you send me some information on it and if possible, how much it would be worth? Thank you, Brad Boudreau

Luxardo bottles were first imported in this country in the 1930s.  One recent price guide says "Bottles in mint condition with the original label, and with our without contents are very rare, collectible and valuable.  The range of prices in the price guide go from I did not find yours listed a  low of $15 to a high of $60.  In some older price guides I found some listing for $300-500.  I found one reference in an old guide to a Luxardo clock produced in 1960 at the time (1970s) it listed for $11.  Digger

I had found a bitters bottle a few years ago and I was wondering how much it might be worth. It is aqua in color and 6 inches high. It is round but has 12 flat sides. It states ATWOOD'S JAUNDICE BITTERS FORMERLY MADE BY MOSES ATWOOD GEORGETOWN, MASS. The bottle does not have any cracks or chips. There are bubbles in the glass. On the bottom there is the letter "P" over the number 22. Could you tell me about this bottle and possibly it worth? Thank you, Brad Boudreau

Brad, the brand goes back to the 1840s and there are many many variants most of which are fairly common.  The Manhattan Medicine Company of New York purchased the rights to manufacture it from Moses Atwood.  Later variants might have a double collar top.  The bottle can even be found in the familiar aqua 12 sided shape with a machine made lip.  I checked Ebay today and found six of them for sale, three had bids.  The highest bid was $10.  Digger

DEAR SIR. I HAVE FOUND AT A GARAGE SALE AN OLD BABY BOTTLE FROM PYREX, THE NECK IS SMALLER THAN WHAT I'VE SEEN . THE NAME PYREX IS CROSS FORM COULD YOU PLEASE TELL ME HOW OLD YOU THINK THIS BOTTLE IS . MY PARENTS HAVEN'T SEEN ONE AND THEY ARE BOTH 64 YOUR HELP WOULD BE APPRECIATED, AND HOW MUCH YOU THINK ITS WORTH.. THANKS AGAIN, PAT

The Pyrex bottle was patented in 1919.  In 1922, 4, 6 ,8 and 10 ounce sizes were made.  the 4, 6 and 10 ounce were discontinued before 1928.  The small mouth took a pull on nipple and in 1930s and 40s you could purchase a Steri-Seal glass cap.  the bottles were discontinued in 1974.  the shoulders on the older bottles are slightly concave while the shoulders on the newer variants (1930+) are slightly convex.  The oldest ones have the 1919 patent date embossed on the base. I'd estimate a value of $8-10 more with the rubber nipple and or glass cap.  Digger.

Hi, I found 2 bottles and I am trying to find out what type of bottles they are. Both bottles are about 7 inches tall. The first bottle is green and has a round seal protruding from the center which reads "j m Oliver & sons", it also has a stencil on the side that reads "this bottle registered April 12,1897 and must not be sold". The second bottle is amber and has a oval seal protruding from the center that reads "James Wagniol". These bottles were found around the University of Pa in Phila. If you could help identify what type of bottles they are, I would be grateful.

The oval seal you describe sounds like what is known as a slug plate.  This was put into the bottle mold and had the lettering engraved that produced the embossed wording.  I think you have a soda bottle and a beer bottle.  Unfortunately, without a better description of the mouth, I cannot tell you much more.  Check out the Ask Digger  link at the bottom of the page for the information about what to include.  Digger.

Hi Digger... I was wondering the price on a schnapps bottle I just acquired... It is 71/4 in. tall, dark olive green, crude with lots of whittling. It sports a bulging, crude base, but no open pontil. It is embossed J. J. Melcher's Aromatic Schnapps wz on three sides of this bevel-edged diminutive case bottle. Thanks, Ron Johnson

I have not heard of this brand of Schnapps but I'd guess a value of $40-80 depending upon rarity.  I sent a note to a Schnapp's collector, we'll see what he says.  Digger.

His reply: Hey Digger,  Well it's safe to say you were on target with your pricing. I have 2 Melchers exactly as you described. 1 smooth base & 1 pontilled. ( sand, not open ) I paid 45.00 for the smooth based example and 90.00 for the pontilled one. Generally a scarce schnapps with the pontilled ones being almost non-existant. I'm still gathering items and imformation for my schnapps book.  Keep up the great work & drop me a line anytime especially if you run across any good schnapps. Even if the item isn't for sale I would like to know about it. Thanks a bunch, Joe Preast

Hi. I have a bottle that I've been trying to research, but no luck. It is a pickle bottle - 6 sided with flat panels. It has two side seams, BIM, and appears to have a rolled lip. The base is slightly indented (round) and smooth. It is aqua green, 7 inches high. The glass is in excellent shape (no cracks, chips). The label (which is shared on two of the panels) is intact, with a small piece missing on the bottom. At the base of the neck (round) there are small raised dots. The label states: Fine Mixed Pickles prepared by (then there is a coat of arms, which is much like the one I am attaching - but there are only 9 fleurs de lys on the first and fourth quarter)  Staple & Strong Co., Staple St. Bermondsey, LONDON. The label colors are green, red, white and black. Any answers re this bottle is greatly appreciated. I have looked at previous questions and answers, but have yet to find it.

Many English food products like pickles were imported into the country during the 1800s.  Many of the bottles have registry marks on the base or bottle which can help date them.  Sometimes it might just be a letter on the base.   I suspect the American bottles below look similar to yours.  I have no references to research English bottle and could not find any information on your bottle.  with a label it should have good value I'd say $40-50 minimum.

Hexagonal pickle bottles often are found in a half gallon size. 

  Unfortunately, your drawing did not come through.  The amount of decoration on the bottle itself is a factor in value.  Note the fancy panel embossing on the example at the left.  These date from about 1860-1880.  Without the decorations it would probably be later.   Digger

Hello there! I am looking for general info on ink wells, can you help me? I am a full time calligrapher and have started a small collection of bottles from my travels. Thank You, Dwight

Inkwell collectors and ink bottle collectors are two different breeds.  I have seen a book or two over the years on ink wells. There is apparently a new book out on them:  "The Collector's World of Inkwells" Written by Jean and Frank Hunting Size: 8 1/2" x 11" Illustrations: 1017 photos Pages: 288 Hard cover  over 1,000 photographs of inkwells and inkstands, circa 1750 to 1920, by makers in the United States, Europe, and Asia, including Tiffany, Wedgwood, Quimper, Staffordshire, Sandwich and Vaseline glass, majolica, art pottery, fai**ence, milk glass, and Delft.... With detailed descriptions, a historical perspective, tables on United States patents and designs, an up-to-date price guide, and an index, this book is a necessary source of information for collectors and dealers of writing instruments." A copy is for sale on Ebay today.  If it is ink bottles you have then both of my price guides would be good references.  Digger.

ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY

We have just acquired two bottles, one very dark purple the other a deep bright red. The red has been called "pigeon blood glass". No one seems to know where these actually came from, or why this particular one is called the pigeon blood. The shape is like a decanter, rectangular, about 9 inches, with an large open top with spouts on each side of the rim. Any information would be appreciated. thank-you! Dale Butler

According to one source pigeon blood glass was produced in the late 1800s.  It  may be distinguished from other dark red glass by its distinctive orange tint.  Beyond that, I do not feel qualified to advise you.  Send a picture and I will post it.  Digger.

Hello. Would you be able to point us in the right direction for information on tumbling bottles? Maybe articles or books on the subject? We are wanting to purchase the equipment necessary, but we need to educate ourselves first. Or maybe some people to talk to? Any help would be much appreciated from an expert such as yourself. Thank you, Michelle Ellis

Michelle, methods of polishing glass have been shrouded in mystery for years.  My knowledge of the subject has come from extensive contact with other persons involved in the hobby and from personal experience in cleaning.  Many of the professionals involved are reluctant to reveal their secrets.  I am not aware of any articles or books on the subject.  I do sell a set of plans with instructions with cleaning tips and on how to do this if you wish to build you own machine.  If you are looking to buy an already assembled one I know several people who will custom build one for you.  I'd suggest you check out the information on my home page under the link for "Cleaning." From that information you can get some idea of whether or not cleaning is for you.  Many beginners think they will clean just their own collections.  For the most part, it just isn't feasible.  It is not worth cleaning a bottle worth less than $20.  You'll invest too much time and or money to make it worthwhile.   Professional cleaners charge anywhere from $12-100 to clean a bottle.  Digger

Hi I'm new to digging bottles and was wondering, how do you go about finding dig sites, and old dumps? and once you find these things how do you know where to dig? thanks rock1187

Rock, the first thing you need to do is send off a check or money to purchase my digging guide called "The Secrets of Privy Digging."  In it, you will find my tips of 20+ years of digging experience.  Without being rude, good advice is worth paying for.  Bottle dumps are getting scarce.  There was in the 1970s a huge amount of digging and much of the easy digging is gone.  One can, through research find promising places and there maybe still be dumps located on private property that can be accessed.  Attend bottle shows, read all you can.  Digger

I am in search of Cuban milk bottles.... don’t know anything about them except a friend of mine wants some............ would appreciate any help or direction you could provide! thanks... Jennifer Swanger Atlanta, GA

Jennifer, About the only place I can think of would be on Ebay or through the Internet. I did a search on one search engine under the words "Cuban Collectibles" and got 41 hits some of which looked promising.   There was an event last year called "Cuban Nostalgia" 2000 Exhibition, in Miami, Florida."  There are a number of bottle shows in Florida each year.  It is possible some would show up

Also I submitted a couple of bottle questions that never got answered. The first one was that I have (in three pieces of course) a Dr. Hooflands German Bitters, Liver Complaint, not an uncommon bottle but it was OP, I have found listed the OP Hooflands German Bitters and the non OP Liver complaint, but not the OP Liver complaint, any idea? Second one I'm stumped on, It's a hinge mold (came out of the same pit as the Hooflands OP and several other OP frags) Dr. Harter's Ague Specific. I have not been able to find it in any of my books (I really need to buy your whole set so I'll quit asking so many questions don't I?, lol) or on E-bay and there are plenty of Dr. Harter's bottles out there just not this one. A little info on the cure itself , the date and the price range would be appreciated. I've attached pictures of both. Take care and dig safely : ), Jason D. Blevins Bottledigger

Jason, it looks like you have been doing some fun digging.  The authority on Bitter's Bottles is Ham and Ring's new book.  Every variant listed (open pontil or smooth base) has the words "Liver Complaint," embossed.  I have dug a number of open pontil Hoofland's over the years and all of them have had the "Liver Complaint" embossing.  I am not sure what book you are referencing, but some books give incomplete descriptions to save room.  I suspect that is the case here.  I have a listing in my pontil medicine encyclopedia for a pontiled variant of your Dr. Harter's Ague Specific.  The bottle is a product of the same Dr. Harter as the Dr. Harter's Bitter's fame.  Dr. Milton George Harter became the Dr. Harter's Family Medicine Company:  Among his products were: Dr. Harter's Fever and Ague Specific, Dr. Harter's Fever and Ague Pills, Dr. Harter's Lung Balm (two sizes), Dr. Harter's Soothing Drops, Dr. Harter's Liniment, Nerve Pills, Female Regulating Pills and of course the famous Wild Cherry Bitters.  Dr. Harter died in 1890.  Interestingly, his daughter married Mr. Hayner of Troy, Ohio (Hayner's Whiskey was a big seller around the turn of the century).  The bitters part of the business was so large that the operation was moved to St. Louis.  The C. I. Hood Co. (Hood's Sarsaparilla fame) eventually became owners of the Wild Cherry Bitters.  The bottle you dug was probably his first product which gained any wide-area distribution in the Mid-west. I'd guess that he began making it about 1855-1860.  Digger

I would like any information on this recent find, a 1 1/2" diameter base, 5 3/4" tall with 7/8" diameter lip. the 1 1/2" dia. base tapers to a 7/8" dia. in 4 1/4" of length then has a straight 3/4" neck going up to the 7/8" dia. lip area of the top. This bottle has the name "Jennings" above an oval area, the oval area is 1" high x 1 1/2" wide, inside the oval emblem is the words "Condensed Pearl Bluing" Then inside this oval printing are the Initials "C. P. B." The Seam appears to be ABM, running the full 5 3/4" length. I would appreciate any information on history or age of bottle because "Jennings" is my Wife's maiden name. Thank You Neil

I could not find any reference to your bottle.  If the lip takes a cork versus having a screw top, then I'd say it probably dates in the 1920-30 period.  If it has a screwtop then later.  Maybe a reader will help.  Digger

Can you tell me anything about this great bottle? It has a cooling crack just on the bottom, the mold line stops at the beginning of the neck and is 11 1/2" tall, clear and I think it is Pres. Taft. Mark S. Hutchins

 

Your figural bust is of Louis Adophe Thiers, (1797-1877).  He was a statesman, historian and president of France from 1871-1873.  The bottle you have is probably European and quite scarce.  A perfect specimen (shown at left for comparison) sold in 1995 for $150.

Dear Mr. Digger, I was wondering if you could give me some info. on an 1968 liquor bottle, It is about 10 inches tall, the bottle shape is of a small stocky game bird known as a quail, It is brown, white and tan in color with raised feathers, With a cork top head, There are no seams showing on the bottle it appears to be made in one piece. The base is brown and it is about 3 1/2 inches in circumference. On the bottom of the bottle writes "O.MB=2 LIQUOR.BOTTLE 1968" Thank You conni

I found listings for several quail decanters but not yours.  Maybe a reader can help.  Digger

I would like to know if you could tell me about this bottle? it has Hamlin's wizard oil embossed on it. it has a applied blob with collar. it is rectangular, aqua, base is key mold with open pontil. I would like to know anything you can tell me: age, rarity, value

I have never seen a rectangular variant of this bottle with an open pontil.  There is an oval variant with Hamlin's Wizard Oil / Cincinnati, O. and a similar one except embossed Chicago.  Both bottles are 4" with a rolled lip.  The bottle you describe rectangular with the double collar has a hinged mold smooth base. John Austen Hamlin began as a traveling magician turned traveling singing medicine show salesman.  He tour in a medicine wagon pulled by a team of horses.  In 1860, he moved to Chicago from Cincinnati.  He was later joined by his son and the business was built to gigantic proportions.  From the profits he made, he built an opera house.  The brand was still being listed in 1905.  If your bottle is as described, it is unique and would bring $200-400+.  Without the pontil, it sells for $20-25. Digger

 

any info you may have would be welcome-- small bottle-4.5 inches tall 1.5 inches square--embossed---Prof. Callan's World Renowned Brazilian gum-- clear with green tint. thank you Ahab

The bottle is not rare.  It was glue advertised around 1891 and still for sale well after the turn of the century.  I believe it was a trying to be a competitor with Major's Cement.  The two bottles are almost identical in shape.  It is sometimes mistakenly listed with medicines, but I am fairly certain it was not a medicine. Digger

Digger, I recently found your site and am excited to find out if you can tell me anything about a soda water bottle that I have with Mickey & Minnie's faces each embossed in a circle on one side with "Mickey" and "Minnie" embossed under their faces. The other side has the same Mickey face on top with the older skinny Mickey full body and "Mickey Mouse" embossed on the sides. The bottle was manufactured by Dry Bottling Co in San Antonio, TX and is in excellent condition. Can you help. Thanks Doc

I was not able to locate anything.  It might be a rare piece and valuable.  Maybe other readers have seen the bottle.  Digger.

I found a bottle embossed with "Hinds Honey and Almond Cream A S Hinds Co Bloomfield NJ USA" on the front and "A S Hinds Co IC4-IA H 17" on the bottom. The bottle is clear and it stands 3 7/8" tall. It has a square type bottle with a screw top and a smooth base. I would appreciate any info you could give me on this type of bottle. What was the cream used for, when did they stop making it, etc. It is in good condition-just a few very small scratches on the bottom rim and it is very clean. Found it in a river. Any help you could give would be appreciated. Thank you in advance. Brenda Hart

This was a hand  or skin cream bottle.  You can find non-machine made cork top examples as well as samples of this product which was popular from the late 1890s on. the bottles are common.  Digger.

Mr. O'Dell, Back in the early 1980's while working on an addition to a Detroit school that had been originally built in the 1930's I unearthed various beer, milk, pharmacy and liquor bottles. I have had them in boxes for the last 20 years and now would like to clean them to possibly try to sell them. My question is should I attempt the cleaning process and if so can you give me some pointers on what products to use, etc. I have gone online and read Glen Poch's newsletter in regards to this but I would appreciate a second opinion. Any advice you can give me will be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Bill Fenwick

Soap and water, a plastic pan or pail, kitty litter, a good bottle bush and lots of elbow grease.  The bottles unquestionably will sell better clean.  You'll find you cannot remove some stains by hand.  Check out the bottle brushes off my home page.  Follow the link below. Digger

bottle is 7" tall, light aqua in color +has a blob top. it has a smooth bottom and the letters w k embossed in it. looking from the side one side of the bottom seems thicker then the other side. on the front is embossed willibaldkuebler in an upside down horseshoe shape, under that in a straight line the word bottler + under that the words Easton pa. glass has a few defects that look like mold marks in it. Has some chips around the top. bottom is indented. The only info i have is that it was found while skin diving off the n.fla. coast but not sure of that. also just below the neck is embossed the letter w. hope this is enough info for an i.d. thanks in advance r.c.matthews

You found a squat soda dating to the 1870s.  The bottle is listed in several soda books, so I expect it is not rare, but might be scarce. The bottle originally had a wire bail and metal cap.  One wonders how it got all the way down there.  Possibly by boat.  I'd estimate the value in mint condition (no stain etc..) around $30-40.  Digger

Recently acquired a Hayner Whiskey Distillery bottle out of Troy, OH. Bottom is marked "Design Patented Nov. 30, 1897. In center of bottom is a small diamond shape with either 203 or 208 in it. The glass has turned amethyst, so it's my understanding that it once was green. The design is very similar to the 1897 patent sketch for a bottle from Alton, IL (shown on your site). Can you tell me anything more about it? Thanks, Gail

Gail, check out my comments about the Dr. Harter's bottle above.  Your bottle is common and comes in clear and amber.  The Hayner Whiskey Company of Troy (just north of Dayton, OH) also put up a combination lock bottle.  The bottle stopper had a combination lock.  The Hayner's bottles sell around $8-10.  The combination lock ones might bring over $100.   The business was at its peak around the turn of the century. The bottle was never green.  Only clear glass can turn amethyst with exposure to the sun or ultra-violet rays. Digger

I just bought a collection of Horlick's Malted Milk glass containers. Can you suggest a source to do more research on them? thanks Bob Noble

James and William Horlick began the business in Racine, Wisconsin about 1883.  Some company advertising puts the date at 1873. Their product was highly successful because of the difficulties of transporting milk products without spoilage. They developed a milk-malt-wheat preparation which needed no refrigeration and was high in natural vitamins and minerals.  At the time consumption (TB) was ravaging the country.  Millions were dying from this "wasting disease"  Many doctors and medicine maker advertised products to help patients regain lost weight.  The early  Malted Milk advertising was directed at infants, and invalids.  The beverage was tasty and became a popular drink at soda fountains.  It also was part of foods used for troops in World War I and II.  Sometime in the late 1970s or 1980s the brand was purchased by Beecham Products, Beecham Inc., Pittsburgh.  You might see if they are still in business.  I know many people collect Horlick items.  Other collectors would be a good source of information.  I expect the Racine Public Library or local historical society has a file on the company.  Digger

I have found a brown Hilex bottle that is 1 quart, 9 1/4 inches tall has a screw on cap , side seams. I don't know anything about bottles this one was discovered when we had a heavy ran and it washed some dirt away and there it was. Thank You Lori

Hilex is or was a detergent.  I do not think the bottle is too old probably no older than the late 1950s to 1970 period.  I do not think it has much value.  Digger.

Hello! We are having some serious work completed in our back yard. We live in an old coal mining town, so much of the town is back filled. We figured during this work we would come across something and of course we did. We came across an old transparent brown bottle, with its lid.. It is a pint bottle, with grapes and grape leaves all over it, excluding where the label should be. It does have a seam going all the way to the top. On the bottom of the bottle are the words "wine oval". No chips, just a pretty corrugated lid. Also on the bottom is a #6 and either NG or MG in italic. Is it something just to put in the window and enjoy or possibly worth something? Sure is a nice bottle! Thank you for your time! Barb Leedom

If you like it and since you found it I say display it.  It is a part of the history of your property.  Monetary value is not the only important consideration.  The bottle itself probably has little value but it is a piece of history.  Digger.

I am looking for info on a jar embossed on one side with COTTAGE CHEESE WASH AND RETURN and on the other side CLOVER BLOSSOM CREAMED COTTAGE CHEESE. The jar is clear and also has a row of 6 embossed flowers around the top. The seams stop at the lip. 51/2" high, 2 1/2" at base and 2 3/4" across the lip. I believe it has a rolled lip. On the inside of lip 1/4" down is another lip. The base is smooth with a circle slightly off center. Below the circle 18 appears to the left of an oblong O with a diamond across it. To the right of this mark is a 3 and beneath it is a 5. The jar is in perfect condition. No chips, cracks. Any info you can give me would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Rita Stone

Without a town or location it will be very difficult to find where this product was from.  If you found it locally then check with older residents to see if anyone has heard of the dairy.  thousands of dairies all over the country produced such bottles.  The name may not even be unique.  Digger

Hi Digger, I have a clear glass bottle that is 9" tall shaped like a rounded older lady wearing what looks like a long coat. She has a tall hat on her head and cross handed in front, is holding an umbrella in one mitted hand and a good sized hand bag in the other. On the bottom it says patent applied for, also on the bottom there is a 7,4,0, and an oval and diamond symbol. This is seamed top to bottom. Any idea what it was or is? Thanks, Wayne

I was not able to find anything out.  A picture would help.  It sounds like it has the Owens mark on the base.  Likely it was a product bottle of some type.  Digger

Hello! What a great website you have! I discovered it as I was trying to find information on a bottle stopper I recently bought. Perhaps you could help me or direct me to another source? This stopper is made of a ceramic or dark porcelain material. It looks like it was painted silver but this has pretty much all come off. It is a devil head with much detail. The cork stopper on the bottom is attached with a screw. The bottom of the cork is worn. I will try to attach a picture. Thanks for any assistance you could give. I haven't a clue. Sincerely, Kathy Bouchard

 

Your cork reminds me of the face jugs produced in the South as shown at the right.  Perhaps it was a stopper for such a jug.  It might be a stopper from a liquor container. Another possibility is a cane top.  Many canes had figures attached.  The sharp ears would probably negate this idea.  Maybe our readers have some ideas. Digger

1. Green hand blown with visible bubbles in glass blob top with lip underneath says LA - CU - PI - A down the front in raised lettering. Bottom circular mark (pontil?) with A&DHC in raised letters inside the circle. 2. Clear Blown in mold inset sides and front. Front says (leaves) Forny's Alepnkrauler Blutbeleber (leaves) fancy raised lettering. Back side says Made by Dr. P. Fahrney Chicago, ILL. U.S.A. Bottom Pat. Applied for raised letters in a circle with a 2 in the middle. 3. Clear Machine blown flat inset side with Burnett's Standard Flavoring Extracts on the front. Bottom circular mark (pontil?) with 71 in the center.

I have known about but never seen an example of your LA-CU-PI-A Bottle.  It is a product of Samuel Hartman. (Check an earlier question this month about a Mishler's Herb Bitters.)  The bottle is not pontiled.  The product, a blood medicine,  was introduced in 1877. I'd expect the value to be $5-8.

 

 

Your second bottle a product of Dr. Fahrney (He has been covered numerous times in previous months. He applied for a design patent in 1892 for his unique bottle shown at the left.

The third bottle is a product of the Burnett Company of Boston.  They are very common.  Joseph Burnett who began the company was born in 1820 and by 1845 was in business for himself as a preparer, exporter and manufacturer of syrups and flavoring extracts, toilet articles.  He also owned a number of national best sellers such as Cocoaine (for the Hair), Kalliston, Oriental Toothwash and Whitcomb's Asthma Remedy.  Your bottle dates to a period after his death, probably about 1900-1910. Digger

Trying to find out how old beer bottle is. Amber in color , has the words E . Robinsons sons then below that brewers below that Scranton PA below that it says registered. It is about 12inches tall the seam does not run to the top. there are seeds in the glass. Bottom is smooth indented circle. It has a crown top. Any information on how old and if worth anything . Thank you very much, Joe

Joe, The firm was started by Jacob Robinson in 1862.    Elizabeth Robinson was operating the concern from 1876-1890 when the firm became E. Robinson's Sons located at 434- 455 North 7th St. in Scranton.  Your bottle possible dates between 1892-1922. If your bottle is machine made it would be the latter part of that period.  I am not sure of the rarity but typically such a bottle would see for $5-10.  Digger.

I am looking for information about a bottle dated 1621 with a Mayflower emblem etched on it. I have a bottle like that , but can not find information on it anywhere . Can you help me. It has a lid on it too. thanks I think it is a old medicine bottle, but not for sure.

Your bottle almost certainly was not made in 1621 or any time near that date.  I'd nned a better description to give you a better idea.  Check out the "Ask Digger" at the bottom of this page.

Have you ever heard of JaF & Co.? A clear bottle with cork. Thanks for any help you can offer!

No, I haven't, maybe a reader has.  Digger

I am new at the Web and I am trying to find someone (or someplace) to tell me the value of a 1960's whiskey bottle that was remade because the word God was printed on the verse of the bottle. Could you advise me? Nancy McNiece

Check on Ebay for such an items.  I'd need a better description.  Digger.

ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY

 

Dear Digger, Recently, while fishing, I found a bottle buried in a river bank in Southern Illinois. I am not a bottle collector, however, I do enjoy some antiques and especially the history. The bottle I found is light pink in color. It has a seam that runs up both sides but not into the neck and also a seam around the base of the neck. It is an old "medicine" bottle and on it is raised lettering: Front side and Back side both have the words GRATIS LINE (underlined). On one on the narrow sides it has WASSON'S 3W. KING OF PAIN. On the bottom: W.W.W. King of Pain This bottle is in great shape (or at least I think so). It does not have any chips. Can you tell me anything about this bottle? Any history? Any worth? I would love to hear an expert's opinion. Sincerely, Cindy Combs

Cindi, I am pretty sure I have something about this company in my Patent Office research, I just can't locate it. I will keep looking and post it when I find it.  I did check into all my other sources without finding reference to the product.  I'd have to say the bottle is probably scarce and dates to around the turn of the century.  It is nice to have the free trial mark on the bottle.  I'd estimate a $15-20.  Digger.

Pix

Hello, My name is Joyce and would like to know if you could give me any information on the a bottle with the inscription on the bottom of the bottle simply stated: Liquor Bottle 3/4 L T Holland On one side of the bottle is ANNO 1777 and on the other is HERMAN JANSEN SCHIEDAM HOLLAND This bottle is a small clear glass decanter style bottle with a top. It is shaped wide at the bottom and has the narrow neck. I appreciate your help... Thanks, Joyce

Joyce, the bottle is relatively, probably made within the last 20-30 years. Herman Jansen operates a distillery in Schiedam, Holland.  The 1777 date refers to the date of the founding of the company.  The plastic stopper indicates a new bottle.  Value I'd suggest around $3-5.  Digger

 

 

help I found a bottle in my back yard but can't find any information on the internet about it I believe it is a beer bottle the front of the bottle reads the following in raised letters also from what I’ve read so far I believe it to be BIM molded the seams on the sides stop just short of the top and bottom. It is almost clear but I guess it would be called aqua? the bottle reads TROMMER'S EVERGREEN BR'Y BROOKLYN N.Y. REGISTERED THIS BOTTLE NOT TO BE SOLD there is also a what looks like a wheat leaf design in the middle of the bottle with a star with the letter E in the middle any information you could give would be greatly appreciated took a picture hope it comes through thanks again roy

Roy, The John F. Trommer Evergreen Brewery operated at 1632 Bushway Ave.  and Conway St.  The firm began under another name and was known as the Evergreen Brewery from 1897-1920.  Digger

Hi! I have a Canada Dry ginger ale, 10 fl ozs green bottle with a "bird perch" inside, i.e., a glass 'bridge' that goes from one side to the other of glass. The bottle must be about 15-20 years old. It is complete with label and screw-on top, in perfect condition, except it had to be opened to empty the contents to discover this amazing contemporary rarity. I would like to sell (consign) the bottle. Any interest? All best, Paul Argentini

Try putting it on Ebay. Digger

I have an aqua green bottle with a narrow 2 1/2 inch neck and a smooth bottom. There is an inscription, "SALVATION OIL" on the side of the bottle. In smaller letters, it also says, "Trade mark A C Meyer & Co. Baltimore, MD USA" I'm not interested in selling it, just curious as to what it contained. Can you help? Joan Roberts

Adolf C. Meyer & Co. had a line of popular patent medicines.  The Salvation Oil was for pain, gout, pleurisy and many other complaints.  It was introduced in 1882 and sold well past the turn of the century.  Digger

Hi, I found a bottle Friday that is clear glass and about 8 3/4" high. The raised brand name on the bottle is "Budwine". Above this brand name is the phrase "Makes You Glad" and below the brand name "You Are Thirsty". About 1/3 of the way down from the top of the bottle is raised lettering "One Better". The lower portion of the back of the bottle says "Bottle originated 1906. Patented Sept. 17, 1918. And June 28, 1921.

This appears to be a Georgia brand.  it was probably a competitor of "Bludwine" (see one of the earlier questions this month).  I found reference to it being bottled in Athen GA in a painted label bottle produced around 1946. Your bottle would be earlier.  I'd think there would be interest in collecting your bottle.  I'd guess a value of $15-25.  Digger.

i'm trying to track down bottles of my great great grandmother's remedy. I understand it was marketed as Mrs.. Joe person's bitters and Mrs.. joe person's remedy. I understand it may be listed in Carlyn Ring's book on bitters. Any chance you'd have it, or be able to steer me toward a source? thanks. penney

There is a reference in Ham and Ring's book as being prepared by Mrs. Joe Person Remedy Co., Franklinton, North Carolina.  It was a remedy for Scrofula.  The brand was trademarked in 1878 and claimed to be in business for twenty years.  To date no bottle is known for this brand.  It was almost certainly a label only bottle. Digger

Just a quick question.. What can you tell me about a hutch with "Hanigan Bros Denver Colo" embossed on it?? Thanks

Not much, your bottle is listed in one of the soda books.  The embossing goes vertically down the bottle.  Colorado hutches aren't common, but I am not confident to give an estimate, but if forced, I'd guess $50-80.  Digger.

Upon my grandmother's passing a few weeks ago my family and I have been sorting through here estate and have come across several old bottles. I have a question about one of them in particular. It is amber in color no labels, however, on either side the words Hemoboloids are embossed. The bottle is approx the size of a fifth and has a cork in the top. On the base of the bottle is embossed The Palisade's Mfg Co., Yonkers, NY. Any info you could provide me with would be appreciated. I am most interested in attempting to determine age of bottle and worth (if any) for the auction later this month. Thank You for your time in this matter.. Sarah Davis

I found a listing for your bottle in a 1913 Druggist Circular.  The spelling was Hemaboloids but the company was the same.  The contents were "Arsenated with Strychnine."  It was obviously some sort of blood medicine.  I'd guess a value under $20.  Digger

Looking to see if you have ever heard of this seal bottle Olive amber, ladies leg neck, quart size, pontiled, seal attached that reads "OX.R.LLN" this bottle is mint and was found in an old Maine home........ Any help would be appreciated. Thanks Dave Hilton flookout York,Maine

Dave,  I was not able to find any matching seals.  The initials make me think of the Lincoln College common room at Oxford England, but I could find no connection.  The bottle description is a bit unusual as well with the presence of the ladies leg neck.  I'd love to see a picture.  It would help date the bottle.  Digger.

Every once in a while I mess up and leave out someone's question.  If you have submitted a question and do not see it listed please simply resubmit your question and I will include it as quickly as time permits. 

Send your Bottle Questions to:  Digger Odell
Check "ASK DIGGER" for tips about what to ask to get the best results.
© 2000 Digger Odell Publications

Search this Site                 Dig Here Classifieds

HOME                          BACK TO QUESTIONS